Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Zsolt Olah's Thai Back Massage course progress notes
Avatar
Zsolt Olah
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
August 26, 2018 - 9:52 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 1.

Based on the first video lesson, I examined my partner's back. Her shoulders showed mild scloriosis, which was confirmed by her hip's position. This misalignment is probably caused by habitual weight carrying on the left shoulder. 

The question of healthy back shape is interesting. Recently I have read an interesting article, that said that some indigenous cultures may not have back pain because of their back is not S, but J curve. (https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/06/08/412314701/lost-posture-why-indigenous-cultures-dont-have-back-pain?t=1535267207856 ). Maybe the reason to this is not the shape of the spine, but simply that they never sit the way we do. 🙂

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6726
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
August 26, 2018 - 10:51 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Hi Olah, welcome to our community and the Thai Back Massage certification program. Please take a moment and familiarize yourself with our certification checklist to make sure that it is all correctly organized:

Certification Checklist

There is no doubt in my mind that most of the typical back problems are caused by lifestyle habits, and I totally agree with the conclusions in the article which you linked to. You will see that I am listing quite a few of those lifestyle causes in module 2.

Avatar
Zsolt Olah
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
September 9, 2018 - 11:17 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 2

Hi Shama, because of the lifestyle background here in Hungary we also have many people with back issues. However it is also interesting that altough people are aware that they need to compensate for the long hours they spend sitting the activity choice they make often worsens the original problem. I speak from experience, my previous choices of sport activity also added to my back problems. When I started yoga ten years ago and received thai therapy was when the situation changed. That's why I'm planning to combine thai massage and yoga in my practice by offering my thai massage clients complementary yoga lessons. I believe this reflects your key points in the second and the third lessons that massage therapist can improve the problems, but it is the client who has to maintain those improvements (e.g. with yoga). 

It definitely helps my learning process your lectures are tematically clear and messages are very clearly articulated.

Personally I found it very useful to hear about contraindications and I will take them into account. And I also have a question about that: I had a client with a diagnosed cancer who wanted to received thai massage - and thinking long and hard about it, I informed her that any therapy that activates the lymphatic system could be a contraindication. I would appreciate your professional input on this. 

Avatar
Zsolt Olah
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
September 9, 2018 - 11:33 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 3

What I have learnt from this session is very important. In the thai massage training I received we always used point pressure and ninety degrees palm movements, however having completed modules 3 I tried your recommendations and made a significant difference both for my practice partner and for me. 

And although the two hour thai massage sequance I was taught in my training is well built up, I was never explained the logic behind it that you so clearly said in this module: that first we always work with the muscle and then we move into stretching. Now with this understanding I can more autonomously my sessions.

And my practice partner was more than appretiative of the pillow solution 🙂

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6726
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
September 10, 2018 - 2:39 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Definitely Thai Massage and yoga are an excellent combination.

Regarding your question about cancer - this is hard to answer since there are so many types of cancers and stages of cancer. I have worked on clients with cancer, and they specifically wanted to me to work on them. There are massage therapists who specialize in cancer patients. 

However, in general I would say that it is better to be safe than sorry. If you don't know much about the condition and possible consequences, one option would be to ask the client to get it cleared by their doctor in writing, so that you cannot be blamed for any unforeseen consequences. It is also perfectly okay in my mind to not treat such clients if you don't feel confident or knowledgeable enough about it. After all, we are massage therapists, not MDs, or pathologists, or cancer specialists.

Avatar
Zsolt Olah
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
September 23, 2018 - 8:18 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 4

Thanks Shama for your suggestions. 

The rocking-technique you mentioned in this module was totally new for me. Previously I used the pressure and strecthing technique only. The truth is that this new technique the first times made me loose my regular massage and breathing rhythm. I have to synchronize the energy of the movement with the energy of the breathing. Recently I feel more comfortably with it, but I think I still have to practice more. 

Avatar
Zsolt Olah
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
September 23, 2018 - 10:14 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 5

I find the sacrum massage useful, until now I have been using the six-point thumb pressure method on the sacrum. 

I guess a light massage (with fingertips) around the sacrum gives a quick chance to find the individual edges of the sacrum. The one-to-ten method seems to work well. My practice partner once felt significant pain while I was massaging on the midline of the sacrum. She said it, when I put pressure on a "hole". I guess misapplied the pressure point, can it be be my fingers touched the sacroilicum? Can it be so painful?

My practice partner gave an interesting comment, that as I sat over her thighs AND my feet supported her calves the energy travelled with ease from the sacrum down through the ankles.

  

Avatar
Zsolt Olah
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6
Member Since:
August 23, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
September 23, 2018 - 10:36 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 6

I watched the video 5 and 6 two weeks ago, and I have been practicing the whole sacrum massage since then and the general feedback is that after massaging the sacrum, the back and the back part of the leg massages are more efficient. I felt my patients' movements were more flexible, and my patients said the tonality of the massage was deeper and the same hand position (e.g. on the back) gave off bigger impact. Should the body shape and the muscles structure of the patient influence the selection of (video 6) presented techniques? Because the lower arm rotation technique received the strongest feedback.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6726
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
September 24, 2018 - 12:01 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

The six point thumb pressure method which is typically used in Thailand can feel a bit mechanical, and it is static, linear pressure which can easily feel painful. This is also used on the abdomen, and I have replaced this with more flexible and fluid motions.

Touching the SI joint should not be especially painful unless there is a real problem with it (which is possible). Also the sacrum can sometimes be quite sensitive with very painful spots, which is an indication that it needs work.

The general rule is that the techniques are options to choose from, not fixed sequences. Not every technique will work equally well for everyone, so it is always up to the discretion and experience of the therapist to decide which techniques to use. Just because they are taught in this course, doesn't mean that you should necessarily use them all on every client. That's where the art of it comes in. 🙂

Forum Timezone: Asia/Bangkok

Most Users Ever Online: 81

Currently Online:
13 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

mwisdom: 186

DKThai: 174

Karin Secrest: 96

Cindy Gogan: 86

Kathy McChesney: 84

jurasan: 82

Newest Members:

mmoakcom

Pirath

ieltsglobal4

Kah Soon Ng

Jenni O'Brien

Tharuka Ekanayake

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 7

Topics: 1070

Posts: 16186

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 5

Members: 772

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: Shama