Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Themistoklis Papadopoulos' Complete Thai Massage progress report
Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
June 30, 2017 - 4:23 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Creating my personal Topic on the Forum..

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
June 30, 2017 - 4:31 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 1

I watched the first video and I already feel at home.  You have an excellent teaching style and method.

So, having already studied shiatsu I can’t help noticing many common places with thai: working on the floor, having the seiza and the other positions, the hara concept, using the body weight instead of muscle power, being comfortable and relaxed, tuning to the breath, having flow, the secondary role of anatomy knowledge, the energetic approach as more important than the sterile clinical one, the energy lines, and the best part of all the developing of a sense (instead of a mechanical application of techniques)!

But thai seems much richer than shiatsu and more of an art.  I like the variety of techniques, tools and positions both of the practitioner and the client.

Again, I appreciate the structure of this course and will do my best to keep on track.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
June 30, 2017 - 5:04 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Welcome to our community and to the Complete Thai Massage certification program. I am glad that you are already feeling at home! Smile

With your Shiatsu background the Thai Massage training will easily fall into place for you, as you have already noticed with several similar elements. It’s true, Thai Massage is more of an art whereas Shiatsu tends to be more structured and clinical compared to Thai Massage which has more of a colorful cultural element to it.

Please also take a few moments and familiarize yourself with our certification check list to make sure that it is all properly organized:

Certification Check List

Do you actually live in Greece?

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
June 30, 2017 - 7:31 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I’ve already read the certification guidelines.

Yes, I live in Athens, Greece, for 46 years now!

Apart from the financial situation which, since 2010 is pretty bleak, everything else is good.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
June 30, 2017 - 9:24 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

And you speak and write absolutely perfect English apparently. How did you acquire this skill?

I have never been in Greece, but am thinking of visiting probably next year. Luckily I have several course students in Greece, so I have some contacts. 

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
July 1, 2017 - 5:34 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 2

I resonate with the oriental holistic approach. I’m eager to become a massage artist, not a mere applicator.  

I like tradition, because it’s tested for so long. Nevertheless, modifications that come about by someone with deep understanding, like yourself, are also welcome.

Creating my own style seems distant but promising and I trust in your method.

I definitely want to learn how to properly leverage my body weight because I’m small (5 7″ and 150 lbs).

I still haven’t found a practice partner. I hope my wife will agree to play that role for me. We’ll meet in two days and I’ll ask her.  I can’t wait to do the chi machine on her and the kids.

Is it ok if I change partners from time to time or do I have to stick with one?

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
July 1, 2017 - 5:38 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I earned a master’s degree in the US ten years ago, so I practiced my english a bit.

Now you also know me in Athens, in case you come by. If I’m lucky I’ll get some one-on-one instruction..Laugh

Do your other Greek students live in Athens? Maybe I can find a partner among them, if not far from home.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
July 1, 2017 - 11:23 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Actually changing partners is essential. If you only ever work on one person, you will never develop the skill of adapting and modifying techniques to different body types, sizes and weights. Sometimes one technique will work great on one person, but not on another. Or you might have to modify techniques due to the size and weight of a client. If you only work on one person, you will never learn those things.

When people enroll in a course, they don’t have to list where they live. So we don’t have a data base with addresses. I only find out if someone is from Greece if they enroll in the certification program and they post in their bio where they live, or they contact me in another way and introduce themselves. I know for sure that there are several Greeks in our membership. So unfortunately there is no easy quick way of finding them. I had to do a little ‘detective work’ to find them.

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
July 13, 2017 - 1:12 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 3

I tried this module’s footwork once on my wife and three times on my older daughter and they liked it. I also noticed that they tend to relax while receiving it.  I start with the chi machine for a minute or two and then do the footwork, varying the length of each drill according to my feel and connection with the receiver. I think I’ll keep doing all the moves till they sink in and till I develop a personal preference for some of them (if it so happens).

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
July 13, 2017 - 1:48 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 4

Your instruction, Shama, is so to the point, and comes in such a timely manner; I love it.

I have to keep reminding to myself to be more in the flow and less in the mind, to feel the client and to use my body as a whole, as you keep advising us.

I added the additional footwork moves to my regimen. I’ve already applied them once, and hope to practive them two more times tonight. Of course, they’ll be the ending of a complete footwork session.

They feel nice even to me while I’m giving them. I can feel the energy harmonizing in my own body too. That’s instant reward I guess..

Everything’s clear so far.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
July 13, 2017 - 2:05 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

More in the flow and less in the mind is what it all comes down to. It’s the difference between a session feeling mechanical or wonderful. And as you mentioned, if you are in flow you feel great and energized yourself. Smile

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
July 14, 2017 - 3:21 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 5

I like all the leg warmup techniques so far, and they feel comfortable too. I do all the footwork in exact the same sequence taught, but that’s just me. In the future I’ll work more intuitively and selectively I guess.

If the client hurts when squeezing her, e.g. her culf muscles, should I take it easier on her to the point she feels no discomfort at all, or is there a minimum pressure intensity to have any beneficial effect?

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
July 14, 2017 - 10:51 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Calf muscles are often surprisingly sensitive. There should be no strong pain. Some initial discomfort is normal. Here is the principle: There are two kinds of pain.

The first one is sharp, strong, and feels injurious, i.e. it doesn’t feel like it is helping or has any benefit. This type of pain should never be caused by our massage.

The second type of pain is a releasing pain. It starts out as somewhat painful, but it feels like a normal reaction of a tight muscle, and with some work it gets less. It feels like it is releasing tension, and it is quickly reducing in intensity. This kind of pain is okay in our work.

As an example, I get regular foot massage sessions. Practically always the first few minutes feel a bit painful, but this is a good pain. I know it is releasing tension and helping my feet. After a few minutes of massage, this pain disappears and then the foot massage feels really good.

There is a fine line between good and bad pain. This is something which we have to learn with experience, and also via a communication process which I call the “one to ten method”. You will hear more about that later in the course.

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
July 14, 2017 - 7:54 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thank you. That’s a very good explanation. 

I already try to communicate with my partner, to get feedback on how she feels and how long would she like to receive a technique, etc, but I guess your one to ten method is more sophisticated..I’ll have to wait for that..

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
August 30, 2017 - 3:42 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 6

These warmups are so easy to do, especially if you have worn out thumbs and want to avoid using them so much.

The devil is in the detail and I tried to memorize every single one, but then I found it easier to keep the general idea in mind and practice the moves using my common sense as they unfold. That worked, and revisiting the video again and again also helped a lot.

I realized the importance of keeping away from bare bones (ouch!) and taking my time when leaning in with my body weight.

Up for the stretches now!

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
August 30, 2017 - 6:12 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 7

I’ve always wanted to be able to read someone’s body and tell what’s wrong with it, and also acquire the right set of tools to correct whatever condition I face.  So, the insights about the hips are welcome and I trust that in time you’ll give us info about most other body parts also.  

Most people sitting on chairs all day long, to include myself, have more or less stiff hips, so the gentler hip stretch alternatives come in handy.

The initial move, where you elephant walked on the inner thigh and calf, was called a warmup move, while the butterfly move was called a stretch. I can’t clearly distinguish between the two..

When the “knee-traction” hip stretch feels intense, you gave us the alternative of the rotating move, but you said it should be performed in a counter-clockwise direction only. Why is that? I would think the clockwise direction to be more relevant there..

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
August 30, 2017 - 9:33 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I assume you are referring to the ‘butterfly triangle stretch’. This is classified as a stretch because the leg gets pushed down out of the hip which stretches the hip. If you would do this butterfly move on the thigh of a straight leg, then it would be classified as a warm-up move since nothing gets stretched. There is only compression.

Anyway, don’t pay too much attention to the exact distinction. This is just a way of labeling or naming the techniques. It doesn’t have any deep esoteric meaning. 🙂

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
September 1, 2017 - 6:19 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 8

Main takeaways: a) first evaluate the client and then apply the appropriate techniques, b) if it’s hard don’t do it.

The hip pie concept is helpful. I always like to know the big picture. And it also tastes good..

Are there body parts where it’s not a good idea to do the 1-2-3-2-1 sequence?

Leveraging my body weight and involving my whole body now seem like natural choices. Can’t imagine thai without them anymore.

All calf moves feel good to my partners. Hip moves are a different story, and it’s a good thing I have several alternatives to choose from.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
19
September 1, 2017 - 8:34 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

The 1-2-3-2-1 method is a useful crutch, a practical way of organizing the techniques. But it is not something mandatory that has to be applied in this exact way on certain body parts, but not on others. You just do it where it is practical and useful, and if it doesn’t seem to be practical or useful for certain body parts, you don’t use it. It is more about creativity and flow than about following rules. 

Avatar
Themis Papadopoulos
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
June 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
20
September 5, 2017 - 4:56 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 9

Bouncing, like rocking, rotations or even elephant walking are nice ways to cut through muscle resistance.

Leaning my body while exhaling is definitely different than just pushing down.

Most of these stretches are really intense for use on the regular client, so if intend on using them I’ll be sure to ask for feedback in the process..

Forum Timezone: Asia/Bangkok

Most Users Ever Online: 81

Currently Online:
15 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

mwisdom: 186

DKThai: 174

Karin Secrest: 86

Cindy Gogan: 86

Kathy McChesney: 84

jurasan: 82

Newest Members:

Jeffrey L Evans

Duncan Andrew

James Walter

Ambrosia Noir

darlene stark

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 7

Topics: 1058

Posts: 15909

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 5

Members: 762

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: Shama