Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

thai massage back stretch

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Thai Healing Massage Academy logo
Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Tehroma Lask: Complete Thai Massage course notes
Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
February 3, 2022 - 12:05 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 1 - Overview of the Thai Massage System

I enjoyed watching and listening to how you broke down the variety of techniques, tools, positions of the therapist and the of the client and that "anatomy of a move". Your teaching style resonates with me and is clear to follow. 

I deeply appreciated your mention (and this is from memory, not a quote) of how meaningful and beneficial it is to know 20 moves and work with grace and connection with the client over knowing 200 techniques that are performed mechanically. I understand that and I also look forward to learning new moves to integrate into my Thai Massage practice. In my previous training, I learned the fundamentals and how to work "hands free". In working with clients, I find the variety of body parts for doing massage with to be helpful. When I work with a petite client, I tend to work more with my hands (for example, my 16 year old and youngest child). And when I work with a client who has a more dense composition (my husband), I tend to use more of my forearms, elbows, knees and feet. 

The positions described work well for me due to my yoga practice and the classes I teach offer me lots of time to move through poses.

When I was practicing pre-pandemic, I had taken a break from my regular walking and hiking due to my full yoga class schedule and bodywork practice. During the pandemic, I started walking and hiking regularly again. I can feel how my legs are stronger and my stamina is better and how that helps to support my body in Thai Massage now. Currently, I combine walking-hiking with yoga, meditation and reiki and I can clearly feel how the reintroduction of walking supports the massage practice, for me, personally.

Your description of graceful and flowing movement with the client and combining movement with breath stayed with me yesterday when I worked on a client. After our session, she said she felt "lighter" and smiled when she asked, "where has this been all my life". She booked another session with me for next week.

Namaste, Tehroma

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
February 3, 2022 - 9:47 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Hi Tehroma, welcome to the Complete Thai Massage certification program. Please take a moment and familiarize yourself with our certification checklist to make sure that it is all correctly organized:

Certification Checklist

You will find that due to my own yoga background I use some yoga principles in my Thai Massage style that are not taught in Thai Massage in Thailand. This would be the breathing with the moves, for example. I also use elements from energy work and Chigong, like focusing on the hara. Then I have created many rocking moves which are not taught in traditional Thai Massage. 

So my style of Thai Massage is based on the traditional style, but it is enhanced and refined in several ways. Therefore I think that you will get quite a few nuggets out of this course in spite of your previous experience with Thai Massage. Smile

The feedback to your last session sounds great. You must be doing a pretty good job!

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
February 13, 2022 - 9:42 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 2 - Chi Machine

I've practiced this new move with a couple of clients and will enjoy the time to feel more natural in its practice. I can see the movement in the client's body happening through the legs and hips. Not so much in the head like I could see in our video. Perhaps with more time and practice. I have a two sessions booked for this week and will practice more as well as ask for feedback as to how it feels for the receiver. So far, my clients look like they are enjoying this move. They look relaxed while receiving.

As a receiver of acupuncture for almost twenty years, Yin yoga practitioner/teacher, and Reiki receiver/giver, I resonate deeply with the movement of energy and appreciate the emphasis made on Thai Massage and movement of energy in your course. As I connect better with the chi machine movement, I imagine the feel of energy movement may become more apparent. It still feels new to me.

Your recent newsletter on comparisons between western and eastern approaches to massage are insightful and supportive in this learning process. Your mention of the soul of massage, the social interaction and set up of Thai massage was meaningful too. 

I appreciate that I have a year to complete the certification so I will have plenty of time to integrate the coursework with experiential learning. The course of full of nuggets that complement and fill in gaps in my existing practice. Much appreciated and needed support, I am finding here. Thank you!

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
February 13, 2022 - 10:49 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I am happy to hear that you are finding value in the course and in the support. I really enjoy supporting course students, and especially when someone has such a conducive background and experience like you. Smile

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
February 20, 2022 - 1:54 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Complete Thai Massage Module 3 - Foot Massage 1

I love the reminder of how working the feet (hands and ears) affect the entire body. And, I remember when my youngest (almost 17 now) was a tiny toddler and would stretch out their legs and point at their tiny feet asking for a foot massage. A reminder that foot massage feels good at any age. I've also been reflecting on my work with the elderly in yoga and meditation classes, as well as body and energy work. Working the feet being an effective and pleasant way to affect the body and relax when a client might not want too much movement or touch all together. 

For the alternate out-bending of the feet, I'd forgotten before this course about the 1-2-3-2-1 thumb position while alternate bending the clients foot outward as I rock my body side to side. Before this course, my thumb was only on position 1. Thank you for the reminder! This move feels better and like a more integral experience for me and the client with the 1-2-3-2-1 thumb position.

Counter clockwise circular movement with thumb on the sole is new to me. I practiced on my youngest (who I credit in part for inspiring this path in body work from years of asking for massage :-). Feedback was to practice more! I've practiced with my husband and I'm feeling more fluid in the circular movement of my body in concert with the hand positions: squeezing and bending out. I feel confident now to practice this move with a paying client. 

Bending both feet in at the same time, as well as, bending bending both feet down at the same time plus bending both feet forward at the same time: great stretches  for the client. Tops of the feet rarely get stretched unless we practice yoga or get Thai massage. I'm paying attention to my body weight, moving from my hara and using my breath with each movement. Sometimes I find myself using muscle and remind myself to use my body weight. 

Push-pull-rotate is new to me too. I love this one! My youngest said: very smooth, mom! I've practiced with my husband and one paying client and I can see the relaxation in their face as I lean forward to push, rotate their foot towards the midline with my body movement and lean back to pull. A very nice addition to my practice. 

Twisting the feet out one at a time is also new and feels natural to keep the wrist locked and move from the elbow. Again, my clients looked relaxed and receptive during this move. 

I need to practice shaking the foot up and down some more. I love how fluid you make the movement look for both practitioner and client! 

The feedback I get from the foot massage is how good it feels. Like you say, people don't get tired of it.

Thank you for the cool video and views into Thai culture, the public and social nature of massage, in addition to the note about private settings too. Also your newsletter sharing how different clients have different preferences to how they experience massage. I have one client who loves the time to chat and catch up making it a social time. She is a longtime friend and my acupuncturist. I imagine our level of comfort and years of working together contributes to this way of interacting in Thai massage. Other clients are quiet the entire time and go deep within. And others who say something or respond to my check in and then return to their meditation. There is diversity in clients needs and ways of receiving and I follow their lead in terms of how they want to experience their hour of relaxation. I am flexible and love to cater to the clients unique needs the best I can.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
February 20, 2022 - 7:25 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

True, clients typically don't get tired of foot massage. I used to get a one-hour foot massage in Thailand once a week for two decades, and my feeling at the end of the hour was always that I would have preferred an even longer session. Sometimes I asked the therapist to extend the session to a 1.5-hour foot massage.

I have heard from western therapists that 10 minutes on the feet is more than enough - I beg to disagree. I have never had a client who complained about too much time spent on the feet. Smile

Of course it depends on the time we have available for the session, but in general foot massage is always much appreciated. That's why we have an entire course only about foot massage.

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
March 6, 2022 - 2:36 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 4 - Foot Massage 2

My biggest takeaway from this module and foot massage 2 can be summed up as follows: when we work the feet, we can address the entire body; to slow down my treatments and feel what is under my hands with more time and trust that my client is okay when I pause, feel and breathe before moving onto the next move; feeling more than remembering techniques; checking in with my client's whole body when I am working on their feet (or any part of the body); this practice really feels like a shared meditation and like you say, a graceful dance when I remember the above; conceptual learning over mechanical movement memorizing.

A client of mine was commenting about lower back pain. I've noticed for some time his feet and hips show external rotation when standing and very much when in supine position. Before this module, when I had worked his entire body, it looked his lower back pain/tightness got worse. Oh my! So, this last session, I focused primarily on his feet. Bending the feed in, the twist and ankle movement/wiggle being amongst the moves that felt most in keeping with helping to loosen up his hips and relieve the pressure in his lower back. I said before session: I am going to focus mostly on feet today, followed by leg work, arms, and finish with the head, but I that I wouldn't be working on his back. I would work around his back, focus on his feet and ankles to see how this could potentially free up his hips, loosen his gait and reduce the strain and pain in his lower back. The moment he stood up, I could him standing up straighter with an increased sense of ease. I've been watching him walk and he is moving with more ease. This client is my husband 🙂

The shift for me in my Thai Massage practice from this module has been from focusing more on a sequence to slowing down and working more specifically with the area in need of attention. I feel a shift in my practice and therapeutic approach.

Thank you Shama!

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
March 6, 2022 - 6:21 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

You had some profound takeaways from this session. Clearly you implemented them and that's why you got good results. Happy for you! Smile

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
March 20, 2022 - 1:31 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 5 - Leg Warm Up

As I continue to grow in practice with the support of this training, I find myself trusting my intuition more and more.

Warming up the muscles before stretching makes sense for a safe and relaxing experience for the client. Also, a good chance to feel what is under the therapists hands before stretching the client. A good "warm up" for therapist and client alike. 

The invitation to go straight to an area of concern in a client's body, as mentioned in your video lecture, is something I remember from my first teacher, as well. I still find myself starting with a warm up of feet and legs before venturing into an area of concern, like a client's shoulder, for example. The warm up of legs and foot work supports the client to drop into relaxation, I feel, so far anyway, in particular with a client I am working with who has limited range of motion in one shoulder. I look forward to getting to the upper body part of the training later on 🙂

I practiced stabilizing another client's foot to use the butterfly move to warm up the quadriceps and that was great! I didn't have that move and how helpful it is keep the client's leg in place while working the front of the thigh and keep the leg from internally and (especially) externally rotating. 

The feedback I received from a client from squeezing and rolling up the thigh was: that feels so good. 😊 

I've found that most people I work on have tight calves - especially the belly of the calf - so learning another way to work in this area is helpful. Legs work hard to hold us up and carry us around, day to day. Legs deserve some good relaxation and rest!

Thank you for you continued feedback and support. My practice is consistent and clients are recommending my work, buying gift certificates and returning themselves. So, this feels like a good sustainable way to grow: continued learning here, practice, notice my clients and listen to their bodies, their facial expressions, and words. 

P.S. The chi machine is feeling more natural now and when I practice this move with a client, now I can see their entire bodies move with the energy, all the way to their heads. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
March 20, 2022 - 7:56 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

"A good "warm-up" for therapist and client alike."  -  That's a good take on it, warm-up for both.

Indeed, that's the best way to grow your practice, to be so good that they want to come back to you. It seems that you are well on your way to doing that with Thai Massage as well. Smile

I am glad to hear that you are getting the Chi Machine to work all the way now.

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
March 23, 2022 - 7:48 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 6 - Leg Warm Up with Forearms

I am excited to get into the approximate location of the sen lines and be able to identify these energy lines on the client's body. While watching TV the other evening, I found myself tracing #1,#2,#3 inside the leg & #1,#2 outside the leg with one thumb to help me memorize their location.

The "free swinging" movement of the client's leg in the push and let the leg snap back, there is something that feels simply feels good in noticing how a body moves or might not move in a less mobile client. Insightful feedback from the body itself and makes me curious about the client's hips, feet and ankles, as well as, their legs. The feedback I get from clients -- and something I also notice and appreciate -- is also how their hamstrings, quads or outer leg feels massaged underneath from the support of my leg under theirs. 

When I work the IT band, I always look at the client's face as this tends to be a sensitive area. Calves, as well. A therapist friend of mine once said that when you work the outer line of the clients upper thigh, the IT band, outside line #2: "You make no friends when you work that line." Wink Sometimes when I see a client wince or say, "that is really tender", I'll share those words with them and that will make them smile or chuckle and remind me to go easy on that line. 

"The power of softness is the feeling of sinking in instead of pressing down." This reminds me of self care and how when I am tired, this is more challenging to manage. 

When I am working with a client, I often need to pause and remind myself to move with my whole body, check in with my breath and notice their whole body. I need to continually check in with my upper back and shoulders to see if I am using upper body strength or my whole body. I still find myself using strength sometimes and continually remember and practice: using my whole body. These pauses and reminders feel holistic and in keeping with the training, as well as, a sustainable method for building my practice. Thank you for the reminder to "work slowly and in an unhurried way". I feel like those words should be painted in my healing space! It's applicable to so many areas in life. Laugh

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
March 23, 2022 - 10:06 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

"You make no friends when you work that line."  -  I had never heard that one, but it makes sense. That line tends to be quite sensitive. Laugh

It is especially sensitive when you use the thumb for working on that line, which is why I prefer to use a less pokey body part.

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
March 24, 2022 - 2:20 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 7 - Hip Evaluation - Leg Stretches 1

Hip evaluation via the feet is fascinating! Your explanation of the relationship between the feet and hips is very clear. The recipient in your video with left foot externally rotated and right foot slightly internally rotated indicating a twist in the hips now has me intrigued to pay more attention to my yoga student's feet in class during savasana. This will give me direction as a yoga teacher too in determining what kind of feet, leg and hip poses/work to offer in my yoga classes.

"Read the body" and "Observe the body for clues". I can use these words in treatments and in classes in a newly insightful way. My background in architecture leads to a love of puzzles and seeing how parts fit together to make the whole and create what I call a concert of silent rhythm. 

I worked with a client a few weeks ago with limited range of motion in her right hip. For years, I have experienced this in my own body and have used yoga to balance both sides of the body although they are still not symmetrical (and may never be), I feel more in balance in my own body. The move you show here with the gentle rocking movement while the client's right leg (or tight hip side) is leg bent in half butterfly position and gently pressing on the opposite hip/quad for gentle rocking would be very helpful in her situation. I have only seen her once and she said she will follow up so when that happens, I am pleased to have more to offer in her next session.  

I keep a small pillow, soft medium pillow and larger bolster for propping as a big part of my yoga background is in restorative and yin where we use a lot of props. I really like the small pillow and will use it more oftenSmile

In working on a particular client with easy open hips in external rotation but tight (you mentioned this in the example of turning the client's feet inward and how they can be tight/hard to stretch inward to address the outer ankles, legs and hips) and the Hip lift cross pull (over) stretch will be supportive in opening up that outer line of the hip that I feel is pulling on his lower back. I was practicing this move ineffectively and pulling towards my body directly from the client's body and now I see how the pull towards my opposite shoulder lifts the client's hip to stretch the outer hip and lower back. This is a gem! Thank you for clarifying this move in your video.

During the colder months in a warm climate where socks are only occasionally worn, I find that sometimes I skip the Right Angle Foot-hip Stretch - Walking with my feet because my feet are cold and I don't want to touch the client with cold feet! I prefer not to wear socks when working a client because I appreciate the traction of bare feet on surface and less possibility of slipping or loosing my footing. This is such a great move and I hate to skip it as it works well with various (or so far, all that I have worked with) body sizes and types. I can warm up my hands before a treatment but feet are more challenging. This feels like a silly question...Any pointers for warming up my feet before treating a client? 

Thank you for your support and this insightful and wonderful course. I am learning so much and this is making me a better therapist. My clients and I are benefitting greatly.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
March 24, 2022 - 3:13 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

"Any pointers for warming up my feet before treating a client?"  -  Well, I have spent almost my entire massage career in Thailand, and there we have the opposite problem, namely how to stay cool. So I never had to deal with this situation of warming up any body part. Sorry. Laugh

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
March 24, 2022 - 9:54 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Okay, thanks for letting me know Smile I'll keep a pair of socks handy on cold feet days.

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
March 24, 2022 - 10:13 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Complete Thai Massage Module 8 - Hip Evaluation - Leg Stretches 2

The reminders in your lectures, that we don't have to do everything in every session are good to hear. I remember something else I've heard in bodywork practice, "When in doubt, leave it out." 

I learned in the beginning (five years ago and this might be noticeable in my posts) to work in sequence so this course is very helpful in learning how to work more modularly, becoming more specific in working certain areas only and trusting my intuition, perspective, experience and new learnings to evaluate a client's body and condition before I begin to work, as well as, during a session.

The "hip pie" explanation makes working with the hip easy to remember and imagine. Again, my background in architecture fits well with this explanation of degrees. Easy for my mind to adopt.

Legs work hard every day to carry us around and hold us up. It is common for me -- thus far in my bodywork career -- to spend about half a session working on legs as I determine what, where and how else to work. Allowing the lower body to relax and hips to open gives me insight into how to work with the upper body, remembering that as the hips open, there is more space for the spine to move and more ease in the upper body.

Working the calf muscle with therapist's hand wrapped around one calf and other hand stabilizing the knee while leaning back 1-2-3-2-1, a very good one for loosing the calf. This is new for me. I love it.

Rocking the leg sideways to loosen the hip joint is also a great addition to my offerings. Circles, too. I offer this in class but wasn't sure how to provide this technique with a client. 

"Hip pie" placing right hand on hamstrings and leaning in with body weight -- I've wondered how to get to the hamstrings in this move and am happy to have this one in my practice too.

You mentioned connecting with our total energy and how moving with breath automatically slows down the work. Part of my overall practice is self-care and monitoring my own energy to give from a full well when I work with others. At times, this is this is challenging and still deeply necessary in order to work with others. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
March 25, 2022 - 12:31 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

By the way, I looked at your website. Those house designs look really beautiful. I would love to have a house like that.

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
March 25, 2022 - 12:53 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thank you for the compliments! I am currently training a young architect to take my place. I was fortunate to have trained with a talented architect who understood and taught me about site specific design - each home is designed for its location and tailored to the owner - much like working specifically with the needs of each client in therapy. Although both fields move very differently, I find similarities and how architecture and wellness (specifically: bodywork, yoga and mindfulness meditation) compliment and inform each other. The foundation of my background is art so for me, it always comes back to the arts.

This reminds me of an idea. I own a small plaza where my yoga studio and therapy room are located. In the future, I'd love to host workshops and trainings. If you ever feel like visiting Baja, let me know, and perhaps we could talk about offering a Thai Massage workshop to support Yoga teachers in working with their students. Food for thought Laugh

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 9468
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
19
March 25, 2022 - 1:10 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thanks for this invitation. I will keep it in mind.

Avatar
Tehroma Lask
Mexico
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 48
Member Since:
February 1, 2022
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
20
March 25, 2022 - 1:39 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Complete Thai Massage Module 9 -  Leg Stretches 3

One of my biggest takeaways in technique from this module has to do with the spinal twist towards the end of the video lecture. I remember previously doing the more powerful variation when working on my husband. I noticed after a while that it wasn't benefitting him. It was too much and afterwards I noticed his lower back pain had intensified. I decided not to do that move anymore and leave his back alone, only working legs and arms and head. Now, this gentler variation with the rocking and hand under his outer hip is a better fit. I have wondered how to offer him a spinal twist as I feel it is beneficial for his spine, lower back and digestion, but didn't know how to offer him something gentler until this module. This is great. 

I feel confident in a yoga class about offering variations for different bodies as I work with many older students with limited mobility and flexibility. And, I'm always learning new ones. In yoga, there is a saying: there are as many variations of the poses as there are practitioners. Your sharings  are helping to fill many gaps in my bodywork practice as is continued practice with clients and learning from each session.

When I work on flexible yogis, I find their wide range of flexibility to be more challenging than working on a stiffer client. Very flexible clients seem to have what feels like no end to their range sometimes!

Power stretches for yogis and flexible clients, gentler stretches for less flexible clients. 

A kinda funny story I have about working with 1-10. I have a client who is in her seventies and a regular yoga student of mine. She has scoliosis among other challenges. When I taught her about the number system and would ask her for feedback, sometimes she would say, I don't know, maybe a 2 and 1/4 or 2 and half. Sometimes we could get close to a five and she would say, that's a good four and three quarters. And I would ease off. Good communication, a light sense of humor and I am honored for her trust, as well as, the other clients I get to work with.

Forum Timezone: Asia/Tbilisi
Most Users Ever Online: 254
Currently Online:
Guest(s) 9
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
mwisdom: 186
DKThai: 174
Merri Lou Dobler: 168
Karin Secrest: 164
Wendy Choponis: 96
Dean Samuels: 88
Newest Members:
ANNA BENNETT
baubitsa
Heather fixico
Cynthia
shaoyu wan
seville samuel
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 5
Topics: 1448
Posts: 23029

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 6
Members: 1100
Moderators: 0
Admins: 1
Administrators: Shama Kern