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Kendre Petrick's Complete Thai Massage Course Notes
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Kendre Petrick
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October 26, 2021 - 1:42 am
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Interesting, acidosis as a root cause to arthritis. Thanks for the reply!

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Kendre Petrick
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October 26, 2021 - 2:08 am
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Module 11

I am glad your included a continuous video of what the massage consists of without pausing for lesson information, thanks.

I will also incorporate the rocking massage into lymphatic massage. This is a great way to facilitate circulation for both blood and lymph.

It does seem like a lot to remember, but I have started to add some of the techniques to my routine that are new to me. This way I can practice them and try to always include them while making it fluid and graceful.

Great first section. I look forward to learning more.

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Shama Kern
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October 26, 2021 - 8:32 am
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True, there are lots of techniques in Thai Massage. But after a while, you will see a logical flow in it all: feet, legs, hips, abdomen, shoulders, arms, back...

In the early stages don't worry too much about remembering everything perfectly. This will all come with repeated practice. Smile 

You are doing the right thing by focusing on making it fluid and graceful.

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November 4, 2021 - 2:29 am
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Module 12

The low back and hip stretch is new to me in this module. I use a direct yoga lift of the feet to stretch this area, however I can see where this stretch you have displayed is much, much more stronger than what I generally use. The sacrum elephant walk looks like a fantastic technique to loosen up locked SI joints.

In the contraindications section, you are absolutely correct in saying not all body types or conditions are the same. I firmly agree that assessment will give the practitioner more insight on what or what not to include in the session. This, in account with absolute Contra/NO techniques based on client medical/history information, give a client picture on what should be performed.

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Shama Kern
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November 4, 2021 - 3:57 am
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Yes, some assessment goes a long way in doing the right thing for the clients. We are on the same page with this. Smile

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November 5, 2021 - 3:13 am
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Module 13

Pain differences. One thing I do if a client is experiencing pain, I ask them to breath in and out and see if the pain or discomfort subsides. This hepls me gauge whether it is pain or experienced discomfort due to something not perceived as normal. Then I would adjust the stretch or pressure. How would you describe or prepare a client who have not had a massage for awhile that they might experience after effects of toxin release, pain, or headache after a massage. Not all clients have this, especially those who attend massage therapy often. Even myself have experienced extreme tiredness or headache after a deep tissue massage on occasion. What are the reasons for this exactly from your experiences? How can one reduce these after effects if they do occur?

The Hidden Gems are a great add on to the complete massage. You are absolutely correct in the gluts and Achilles are not addressed. I have never experienced these areas massaged during a session and can imagine that it would be very beneficial. Especially the Achilles area, would be beneficial to those who experience plantar fasciitis, etc.

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November 5, 2021 - 9:03 pm
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In my experience these after-effects are quite rare. What helps is to do the first Thai Massage session of a new client in a gentle way without going full-in with strong stretches. I have had such after-effect comments with clients in very rare cases. If I know that I did not work very strongly, I just tell them that their body has to get used to this kind of bodywork and is detoxifying.

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Kendre Petrick
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November 6, 2021 - 2:15 am
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Okay.

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Kendre Petrick
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November 6, 2021 - 2:30 am
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Module 14

In regards to the hip rocking technique, what if a client has an unstable pelvis? A lot of clients have issues with locked SI joints and rotated pelvis. These techniques seem like they would help with loosening up this area for more mobility while increasing circulation into the lower limbs.

In watching the movement techniques around the client, it is definitely similar to how I work, as a fluid motion and even dance-like.

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Shama Kern
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November 6, 2021 - 6:29 am
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Yes, these techniques are very helpful for pelvis issues. Once you get to the prone modules, there is a section about working on the sacrum and SI joint area as well.

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March 4, 2022 - 2:17 am
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Module 15

Any tips for stomach massage techniques for pregnant women?

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Kendre Petrick
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March 4, 2022 - 3:16 am
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Module 16

I like the fluid technique tips on how to move from one part of the body to another. When I perform massage I feel like its a fluid movement and also a good way to indicate where you will be touching the client next without any break in fluidity.

I've never seen the shoulder rowboat technique before. It's similar to the foot pull on the leg. The triangle technique is something I was taught to perform with the client in the side position. I will have to try the supine position as well, as I think this will give a deeper stretch.

Through each completion of limb is the circular motion movements, is this strictly to loosen up after the massage or is there another purpose?

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Shama Kern
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March 4, 2022 - 5:59 am
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"Any tips for stomach massage techniques for pregnant women?" -  If you would want to work directly on the abdomen of a pregnant woman, I would use oil massage techniques and not Thai Massage techniques.

"Through each completion of limb is the circular motion movements, is this strictly to loosen up after the massage or is there another purpose?"  -   If you are referring to the circling in the One Side Two Handed Shoulder Lift, this is in itself quite a powerful massage technique for the traps. If you were referring to something else, please let me know.

In general, circling is a very useful technique for many aspects of Thai Massage. Circling, like rocking, can't be resisted like pressure or stretching can. 

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March 5, 2022 - 10:16 pm
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Circling in the sense of shaking or racking the limb to loosen it up.

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Kendre Petrick
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March 5, 2022 - 10:40 pm
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Module 17

For sen line work, I use a thumb rolling technique. I like the thumb squeeze you demonstrated. This actually will help as a switch out technique to rest thumb and hand from time to time. This is also similar to lymphatic drainage technique, minus the squeezing.

Great video, this is all good massage information to use for my clients with carpel tunnel syndrome.

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Kendre Petrick
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March 5, 2022 - 11:00 pm
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Module 18

I think it is interesting that the sen lines are similar to the Chinese TCM meridians. How did the Thai find this information out in regards to energy lines?

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March 5, 2022 - 11:09 pm
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Module 19

I am glad you incorporated a review video of the different parts together. It is a lot of information and important to see again in real time all together. Thanks.

The circulation motions I referred to previously are the continuous rocking or shaking movements. Is there another purpose other than loosening up joint and limbs?

I really like the around the head movement. I think stepping over the client breaks the energy flow, so I try to do this always.

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March 6, 2022 - 6:17 am
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"I think it is interesting that the sen lines are similar to the Chinese TCM meridians. How did the Thai find this information out in regards to energy lines?"

Well. all the energy lines in the various cultures are somewhat similar - the Thai sen lines, the Chinese meridians, and the Indian nadis. Where did the Thais get the information from? Thai Massage itself was brought to Thailand from India, so the nadis would be one source.

Then there is also a lot of Chinese influence in Thailand, including a sizable Chinese population. There is also the theory that the Thais had migrated from China a long time ago. So they might have been influenced by the meridians as well. Nobody knows for sure, but the likelihood of these theories is high.

"The circulation motions I referred to previously are the continuous rocking or shaking movements. Is there another purpose other than loosening up joint and limbs?"

Yes, there are other purposes:

  • It is next to impossible for the client to resist rocking moves unlike straight stretches. So rocking moves get past subconscious resistance.
  • Rocking moves are more gentle than stretches. Some clients cannot handle the stretches well, but the rocking works great for them.
  • Rocking moves are excellent therapeutic tools. They are sometimes much more effective than other tools like stretches.
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Kendre Petrick
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March 7, 2022 - 11:41 pm
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Interesting! Rooted in India and China.

I think rocking also helps with lymphatic circulation.

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March 8, 2022 - 12:03 am
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Module 20

I am looking forward to using the Achilles stretch for clients who have plantar fasciitis issues. I have never used the elbow roll technique on the foot, only the arm roll from side to side.

I started incorporated the Achilles tendon massage to clients after you demonstrated in a previous video and with reflexology. I do indeed get a lot of positive feedback about adding this massage to my routine.

I use a BOPPY baby nursing pillow for those who do not like being prone or big breasts. This pillow fits right under the arms/chest ergonomically, which elevates the head and neck in a neutral aligned position and is quite comfortable.

I actually spent over a month in Thailand in 2010. It was a fantastic experience.

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