Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Thai Healing Massage Academy logo
Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Ka’el Bey’s Complete Thai Massage Progress Notes
Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
41
September 15, 2019 - 4:04 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Shama Kern said
Regarding the rocking techniques in module 19, if you feel that you getting the rocking effect and your foot isn't quite reaching, this is not a big deal. You might be able to extend your reach if you sit up a little higher on the near side of your client's body, like on your heel. The same idea applies to module 14. Try sitting on your heel which elevates your body, extends your reach, and gives you better leverage.

If your foot does not touch the mat at all, it can feel a little wobbly and it feels like you are not having enough leverage.

  

Thank you for your feedback. I tried this technique again last night, but it was before I read your post. My foot was able to touch the mat this time. I still felt like I could use some more leverage. I will sit on my heel next time. I am used to do this in yoga and meditation.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
42
September 15, 2019 - 4:27 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 20 (Prone Position Legs 1)

Elbows and forearms are my favorite tools in Thai massage. I have an old wrist injury, so I try to use my whole body to avoid over using it. I used my elbow to hit the acupressure points on the inside and outside lines of my clients foot. I had great feed back from this move. I could tell that my body position was not perfect. I took another look at your video and saw how I need to position myself in the future.

I wanted to try the traction move that your showed, but I couldn't remember it in the moment. Instead I applied the rocking technique. I was also able to massage the Achilles tendons.My client had a slight knee injury, so I used a bolster under the ankles. This allowed me to elephant walk along the legs and open up the sen lines after.

I appreciate the face cradle simulation techniques that you shared as well. I normally put a pillow under the chest, but I now I have more options if this doesn't work.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
43
September 16, 2019 - 1:44 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Re-watching the videos will generally uncover something that you had missed or forgotten, according to feedback from many course students.

I am a big forearm fan as well since my wrists are not 100% either. That's why I could stick with Thai Massage for two decades - the ability to take the stress of your hands.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
44
September 19, 2019 - 8:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 21 (Prone Position Legs 2)

I ran into one of my former yoga students at a bookstore the other day. Her L4 and L5 vertebrae are fused and have been causing her chronic pain.

She has taken pills, received steroid shots, and been in and out of physical therapy but without any improvement. I taught her how to use a yoga block to do the bridge pose and it provided her some relief, but that was over a year ago. After she set up her massage appointment, she was about to cancel her physical therapy appointment. I encouraged her to give it another try and come see me after.

 I have been doing my best to give my clients exactly what they need instead of doing a sequence. For this lady, I did a really great job of that. She told me that she like the PT appointment because he pulled on her legs. I immediate stated of by doing the same thing, but Thai style.

In the prone position, I slid under her leg in what I call the “tea ceremony” position to lean into the 3 points on the back of the thigh. After this, I rolled out the muscles with my forearms. Then I pressed into her calf and low back with my hands and raised my supporting leg to traction the spine.

I could feel and hear her vertebrae pulling apart and crunching back together as I released. It was the craziest thing I have ever felt while giving a massage. Thankfully this was extremely beneficial to her so I continued to do this slowly with calm breathing. 

To Be continued . . .

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
45
September 19, 2019 - 9:04 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 22 (Prone Position Legs 3)

Before I did this stretch, I warmed up her quads with some of the leg stretches from this module. She happened to be very flexible. This allowed me to try the variations that bend the leg toward the outside of the hip, rather than into the glute. I didn’t know about these variations before, and normally reserved the quad stretches for stiff people. 

The two leg raises that you showed would have been great to apply, but we were running short on time. I applied one of them. I sat on her hip and pulled the leg up. I have done this one before, but I honestly forgot all about it. She said, “it hurts so good”, when I asked for feed back. The other variation, where you press their foot into your arm pit and pull up, I have never seen. I do a similar technique sometimes with my knee in their glute or from a standing position. The way you do it looks more supportive.

I finished the massage by sinking my knee into the fleshy part of here glute to release some tight muscles. I used some “pin and stretch” techniques on the one that needed some extra work.

Thank you for your supplementary articles on treating serious diseases with Thai massage. They helped me encourage her on her path to health. All three of us, Kenda, her Physical therapist, and I are confident she will get better. I will see her next week and look forward to skipping sequences and going right to what she needs.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
46
September 19, 2019 - 9:05 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Shama Kern said
Regarding the rocking techniques in module 19, if you feel that you getting the rocking effect and your foot isn't quite reaching, this is not a big deal. You might be able to extend your reach if you sit up a little higher on the near side of your client's body, like on your heel. The same idea applies to module 14. Try sitting on your heel which elevates your body, extends your reach, and gives you better leverage.

If your foot does not touch the mat at all, it can feel a little wobbly and it feels like you are not having enough leverage.

  

I sat on my heel and it made a HUGE difference. Than you for the advice. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
47
September 19, 2019 - 10:15 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

That's such a great story about your treatment there. It's one of those posts that make my day, hearing how students and their clients benefit from the training.

And your last comment shows that it IS possible to correct the techniques without physically being there, at least to some degree. I am glad that the heel sitting fixed your issue!

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
48
September 26, 2019 - 4:51 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 23

I tried these sacrum moves out twice. You’re right, everyone’s sacrum is different. Women definitely have a wider surface area than men. It’s amazing how many knots you can feel in this area. I feel like massaging in the joints are really important because of how stiff it can get. I also appreciate the way these moves allow the receiver to release tension without getting uncomfortable about someone touching this area. I feel like the knowledge of anatomy is useful for these moves.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
49
September 26, 2019 - 5:04 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 24

I watched these moves right before I had a client come in. I was anticipating having to work her back with the traditional Thai massage approach. I was so grateful for the moves that you shared because it will save my wrists and thumbs from being overworked. I did notice that my low back started to hurt because of my body alignment. I do have low back pain, and it particularly hurts when I do certain Thai massage moves.

I noticed this pain immediately when I began doing Thai massage. It really hurt  my low back to do any of the half kneeling postures. Somehow I’ve learned to manage my body weight better and it no longer bothers me. But these moves flared up that feeling again. It hurts right in the crest of my hip and low back.

I am pretty sure it has to do with my thighs not bing in alignment with my back. When I tried to have no bend in my back, and my thighs in line with my back, it relieved the pain. But when I had any sort of hip flexion in my posture, the pain was quite sharp. 

Could you give me some tips to prevent this pain from happing in the various kneeling postures?

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
50
September 26, 2019 - 11:29 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Back pain in kneeling postures is definitely caused by incorrect ergonomics. You already figured out that the back should be straight. Here is another thing you can do. Take ONE kneeling technique only. Then don't just do it quickly, but stay with it. Do it slowly. Obviously you have to explain to your practice partner what you are doing first.

Then start moving into the position and just focus on what you are feeling in your body. If you feel any discomfort, adjust your position until it feels better. This can take several minutes for just one position. At the same time observe your own body for tension. If you find any tension, relax that part of your body consciously.

Play around with this one position and experiment with different angles, different ways of positioning yourself. Do not continue until you have managed to eliminate any pain and tension in your body. Move very slowly so that you don't brush over your own tension. It should be like a self-discovery exercise. 

Then check if you are really working with body weight or if you are muscling it. Check if your breathing is slow and relaxed. Check if you are moving with your entire body, or if you are mostly working with your arms.

Imagine that you are doing a Tai Chi exercise or a graceful dance. Try to copy that feeling into your technique. 

Then repeat this for all techniques that you are feeling pain with.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
51
September 29, 2019 - 2:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 25

I had some good practice with the prone back work. My client had a lot of tension in her lower back. By checking the grooves along each side, I could tell that the tension was more on the right side than the left. I worked the entire back with the techniques from module 24. Then I applied the stronger techniques on the right side.

I used the first 2 techniques with the knees. The third technique seemed like it could be too much, so I did not use it. I had good feedback, but I should have asked her to breathe more. Most of my clients have a better release when I remind them to breathe.

The technique that I should have remembered was palming the trap. muscle. I forgot how to use my knee to lean in. I chose to work them from a seated position instead. The massage lasted about 2 hours, and it felt like only a few moments had passed by. Laugh

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
52
September 29, 2019 - 9:53 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

That's quite typical in Thai Massage that you end up doing a long session without hardly noticing the time pass. Not that I recommend that, but in my practice I have done many 2.5 or even 3 hour sessions. Smile

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
53
September 30, 2019 - 8:58 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 26

I like the elephant walk and horse gallop techniques in this module. They remind me of the traditional back massage, but seem to work better from this angle. When you work on just one Sen line at a time, and add some movements, there is less wrist strain. I was able to practice these techniques twice along with the forearm moves. I like the moves that let you drape the partners leg/arm over your leg. I feel like that connection helps my partner relax. I also tried the neck massage and build the face cradle for one of my practice partners. 

I managed to relieve the back pain I was experiencing by widening my stance and opening my hips like my Tai Chi teacher tells me. This allows the energy in my body to flow up and down the sushumna nadi. If this is going to be a life long practice for me, I need to maintain good ergonomics on and off the Thai mat. I want to be healthy and feel good when I grow old so others can live by my example. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
54
October 1, 2019 - 12:34 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I am glad to hear that you made progress on your back pain issue. Indeed, we need to live by our example. It is pretty hard to try to convince a client that we can help them if we can't help ourselves first!

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
55
October 5, 2019 - 9:18 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 27

I practiced some helpful upper back remedies in this module. I really like the simplicity of the kneading and thumbing techniques. Normally i work on the upper back from a seated position. Likewise I usually massage the shoulder and traction the scapula from the side position. These moves give me the ability to apply techniques without having to move my client around as much. 

My partner’s scapula was particularly sealed to his back. I was able to get under it a little more over time. The deeper stretches were move effective in creating space under the scapula. For whatever reason his palm kept trying to turn face up during the deep stretch. I just allowed it to do what felt natural. His limbs were a bit different anyway. For instance, his feet pointed outward in the prone position, even when i put a bolster under his ankles and tractioned the legs. Overall he commented that he just enjoyed being around my energy and will continue coming by once a month to relax and unwind. 

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
56
October 11, 2019 - 5:50 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 28

Seeing an entire “sequence” from the prone position made me realize how much I have really forgotten. I’m not letting that discourage me because I am learning to become more intuitive and less mechanical. My training before your videos was a massage sequence, and as you might guess, I would find myself giving a one size fits all session, no matter what my client needed. It has taken me awhile to give my report over this module because I was trying to practice a head to toe sequence from the prone position. I finally let go of this endeavor because I have already been doing all of these moves, just not in particular order. Overall I am really glad to have found your training program because it has improved my ability to break the routine that I first learned in Thailand and actually address what my clients need. I am going to use these videos at the end of the module as a reference to see what I need to review. 

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
57
October 11, 2019 - 6:27 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 29

The side and seated position are some of my favorite places to be. I just practiced the adductor stretch with my sister. The palming felt very natural to me and I could sense how far was a good stretch. I also tried sitting on the thigh as a “warm-up”. When I first returned from my journey to Thailand, I tried to do this move, intending for it to be a blood stop. My practice partner told me afterward that it was extremely painful. I was completely embarrassed and have never attempted to do this move again. Your demonstration finally taught me what I was doing wrong. I also liked how you moved up and down the leg. My sister said it felt really pleasant in the moments of releasing the pressure. With proper knowledge on how to position myself, I am looking forward to incorporating this technique back into my practice. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
58
October 11, 2019 - 10:59 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Great to hear that you got away from the 'one-size-fits-all' style! That alone will be a huge move in the right direction of being creative, intuitive, and passing those benefits on to your clients.

And yes, the 'sitting on the thigh' technique has to be done just right to feel good. If not done correctly, it feels terrible, as you found out.FrownLaugh
If done right, it is a great feeling and is very beneficial.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
59
October 14, 2019 - 6:52 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 30

I really liked using these moves in the side position before and after I worked on my partner’s back in the prone position. I was able to find the problem areas during the palming and thumbing. I brought in the stronger palm with my thigh as support on those areas. The strong stretch was the perfect move to release the low back on one side. As far as the twisting. I did alright with he static twist, but the the rocking one was pretty difficult. It didn’t help that my partner’s shoulders were bony and awkward to hold on to. I’m going to have to take a second look at how you were holding on to the shoulders because I tried every way, but couldn’t get a proper grip. That being said, she still enjoyed the session, I just knew I need to improve those twists before I try them on clients. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
60
October 14, 2019 - 1:27 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Yes, the rocking twist is a bit tricky. It's a bit like the Chi Machine or the circular foot bending technique from the early modules of this course. All the techniques which involve several moving parts take more time to learn. You really have to FEEL those moves. Once you get there, these are some of the very best moves.

Forum Timezone: Asia/Tbilisi
Most Users Ever Online: 86
Currently Online:
15
Guest(s)
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
mwisdom: 186
DKThai: 174
Karin Secrest: 125
Cindy Gogan: 86
Kathy McChesney: 84
jurasan: 82
Newest Members:
Darcy Horn
Ilka Mueller-Patham
David
Kp
cash slave
Lucas
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 7
Topics: 1160
Posts: 17623

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 5
Members: 856
Moderators: 0
Admins: 1
Administrators: Shama Kern