Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Thai Healing Massage Academy logo
Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope




Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Ka’el Bey’s Complete Thai Massage Progress Notes
Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
July 20, 2019 - 10:22 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 1

It was refreshing to hear Shama’s perspectives on Thai Massage. 

Some of my new clients are skeptical about getting on the floor. I have never considered using a table, but I do have a chair. On Fridays I give 15 minute “Thai-Taste” on the chair to teach potential clients how to breathe and relax. Some of them decide to book an actual Thai Massage after because they are more trusting of the Thai Massage Approach. 

Because my knowledge of anatomy and physiology is basic, I feel like other therapist and physicians have an advantage over me. I was grateful to hear Shama’s opinion that feeling and sensing are more important in Thai Massage. My clients know that I am less focused anatomically and that I work with the bodies energy. I will keep this explanation in mind as I move forward in my study of the Sen Lines, Anatomy, and Physiology.

As far as body positioning goes, I am happy that I was practicing yoga before Thai Massage. The exercises Shama has shown us in his second video have been staples in my practice. Today, I am paying special attention to my feet. I am planning how I will take care of them for the future. I make sure to include anti inflammatory foods in my diet, like ginger, aloe, turmeric, and cayenne. 

I am very fortunate to be practicing at a nail and beauty lounge where I can have my hands and feet taken care of. I need to get back on my epsom salt soaks too. My feet have come a long way and I don’t want to stop the progress I have made.

I once had flat feet, bunions, and shin splint. I no longer deal with flat feet, or shin splints, but my bunions could still use some healing. This is why I have chosen to embrace eastern style medicines because they utilize the body’s ability to heal itself naturally. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
July 21, 2019 - 1:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Welcome to the Complete Thai Massage certification program. Please take a moment and familiarize yourself with our certification checklist to make sure that it is all correctly organized:

Certification Checklist

It sounds like you are having a good background and a good start! Smile

Regarding feeling disadvantaged because of a lack of anatomical know-how - you might find this article and video quite interesting:

Thai Massage And Anatomy

Trying to fit Thai Massage into the western model of massage work is like forcing a square peg into a round hole. There is nothing wrong with anatomical knowledge, but let's face it, practically no Thai Massage therapist in Thailand knows anything about anatomy, and still everyone is going there to learn it.

Thai Massage uses the sen lines as a map to the body, and western massage uses anatomy as a map to the body. These are two totally different approaches, but they can be combined to some degree. You will see that in this course. But you are definitely not at a disadvantage if you are not an expert in anatomy!

I am curious, how did you get rid of your flat feet? What did you do about that?

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
July 23, 2019 - 5:54 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

There were several things that helped along the way.

I realized that I needed to fix my arches when I was a runner. I began running on the balls of my feet rather than running heel to toe.

This helped strengthen the ventral side of my foot (anatomical termWink). But I still had flat feet.

In Hatha yoga I learned how to grip the floor with my feet for Tadasana and Balance Poses.

When I started Ashtanga, I had to keep padabanda in my feet at all times. This is where I noticed a difference.

When I engaged padabanda in all of my poses, I started having an arch. But after I let go, my arch dropped.

But through a few years of practice, I now have a modest arch forming in my foot!

The exercises you show in module two helped me open those energy lines in my feet as well. I would practice up to 20 even 30 minutes when I was serious about fixing them. 

The most important thing however was walking barefoot on the earth for about 20 minutes a day. Some people call this grounding. I call it planting my feet. Low arches can be caused by wearing shoes and walking on concrete too much. Mother Nature is the best healer. 

This may seem like a lot work (and it still is) but I look to myself to fix my body when it needs repairs. I know it takes daily effort and patience. My feet are my foundation, so I put a priority on that, like some people but priority in their beauty, or hair everyday. 

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
July 23, 2019 - 6:03 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 2

It looks like I got ahead of myself in Module one. The foot exercises I was referring to were actually part of this module. I did take the time to work on my feet and toes the last few days, and plant to continue this self-healing journey.

I was fortunate enough to try the Chi Machine on two people yesterday. My brother told me that it felt very good. I tried on an older gentle man who teaches me tai chi. Afterwards he said that his legs were a loosened up.

In the future, when I practice a new move, I will try to have my partner commit to a 5-10 minute session so they can relax a little more. Because I just tried the chi machine exercise, they talked and were not able to get the full benefit.

The most challenging part about the exercise is knowing the right Rhythm to use. Sometimes I felt like I was rocking to much or too little. My partners didn’t notice this though. 

When I focus on my “Hara” or center, and tried connecting with my clients center, I found the best results.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
July 23, 2019 - 8:15 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

It's true, if there is not enough practice time, and your practice partner is all in his/her head, watching what you do, reacting, giving feedback, it is almost impossible for them to really relax into it and feel what is going on instead of analyzing it in their minds.

The story about your feet was interesting for me since I had a big issue with Morton's Neuroma in my feet which almost prevented me from walking at all. This is a nerve condition which can be really painful. I did a lot of research on this and became kind of a specialist in foot conditions. I healed the condition in my feet with natural means (no pills, no operations, no medical intervention), and today I can walk for hours, no problem.

In the process I learned so much about healing and preventing foot conditions that I added 7 modules to my existing Thai Foot Massage course - all about various foot issues like bunyons, neuromas, plantar fasciitis, etc. You would probably get a lot out of this course. You might consider it after you are done with this one. It's a completely different track from regular Thai Massage, but it is also a perfect combination.

It's something you can make an entire new business line out of - helping people with foot problems. You could probably even add more knowledge to this with your experience of how yoga can help heal such things.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
July 28, 2019 - 1:39 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 3

The Thai Foot Massage Part 1 is quite similar to the system I use. When I practiced, this is what I focused on:

1. Moving my hands in the three positions on the inside and outside of the foot.

2. Shaking each leg after twisting the foot and rotating the ankle

3. Transitioning from each move with mindfulness.

Shama reminded me about the healing art of massage. I am reminded to think of how my client feels when I finish one move and begin another.

I notice that I move more gracefully with my regular clients who I have become more familiar with. 

One of my goals for this course is to have my massage reflect the way I move in yoga and tai chi.

Grace Wu, my kung fu teacher, reminded me of this as well. She said, “you do yoga, martial arts, and healing arts . . .  So you need to walk like you are centered and calm”. 

She demonstrated how I should walk and move and it was just what Shama had said about the massage. You are supposed to move like tai chi or qigong. 

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
July 28, 2019 - 1:53 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

I’ve been thinking about which course I would look into next. The feet are definitely a good place to start.

I hadn’t heard of Morton’s neuroma until you mentioned it. Your story reminds me of the comic book hero Dr. Strange. He was a surgeon who injured his hands, but cured them through his own will and belief. They made a movie on him a few years back. He was my fist kung fu teacher’s favorite comic book character. 

As far as yoga goes, doing “legs up the wall” is a good way to detox the tissues in the feet.

Another exercise I like to do is have my students lift all of their toes up and put them down one at a time. From little toe to big toe and from big toe to little toe.

Then I have them massage their feet for a few minutes and try again.

Most of them notice a significant improvement.

It also helps to visualize them moving how you want them to, then actually moving them that way.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
July 29, 2019 - 2:27 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

It looks like we are on the same wave length here. I like doing therapeutic work on people with problems, because that's where you can really see the results. Actually for the majority of my massage career most of my clients had problems that needed attention. I rarely did just relax massages. My focus on therapeutic work is what resulted in all those therapy-oriented courses which I created as a result of my experience of working on many conditions.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
August 1, 2019 - 6:41 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 4

My favorite exercise to practice from the second foot massage is kneading the foot with both hands.

I tried this while I gave Villy a foot massage.

There are several ladies at the Nail and Beauty Lounge that I can practice with when I don’t have a client.

In return, I get free manicures and pedicures.

It is important to take care of your hands and feet for massage. When your nails grow fast and you work in the garden like I do, this trade off is priceless.

What I like most about Kneading the foot is that by rocking my body, I can send a warm and relaxing sensation through their entire body.

I am used to elephant walking the feet in all directions. I usually rotate, Twist and pull the ankles. Then I thumb along the Sen lines.

I am going to add this technique to transition into the leg warm ups that require the knee to be bend outward.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
August 2, 2019 - 11:57 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Sounds like an excellent trade opportunity for you! And you have easy access to practice partners. Great setup! Smile

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
August 3, 2019 - 4:01 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 5

I got to practice some leg warm ups on my client yesterday.

I transitioned from kneading the foot into the warm ups for the left leg.

When I tried this on the right leg, her hip tendonitis prevented this position, so I finished the warm ups from a straight leg position.

Today I practiced them two times all the way through on my clients.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
August 3, 2019 - 4:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 6

I really like these exercises that apply the forearm.

Normally, I only do this while the client is prone, but the rocking and sinking motions are great for the supine position as well.

I caught on to the rocking rhythm pretty quickly.

Sinking in with the forearm into the thigh was awesome, I knew this one would be really effective.

I even adding in some flavor by alternating using my forearm on the thigh, and when I came up, I pressed my fingers into the sole of the foot.

My client really enjoyed this.

The exercise that I didn’t resonate with the most was working the outside of the leg from this position.

I’ll will practice some more with friends, but for my clients I will stick to working from the outside. 

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
August 3, 2019 - 9:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

The rocking seems to be everyone's favorite. It is mine as well. You will find lots and lots of applications for it in this course.

It is quite normal that you don't resonate with all techniques instantly. Often some techniques fall into place later when you re-watch a video or just get more familiar with the material.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
August 5, 2019 - 1:52 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Shama Kern said
The rocking seems to be everyone's favorite. It is mine as well. You will find lots and lots of applications for it in this course.

It is quite normal that you don't resonate with all techniques instantly. Often some techniques fall into place later when you re-watch a video or just get more familiar with the material.

  

I see what you mean. I’ve replaced palming and thumbing the lines of the leg with your leg warm ups. Each time, I get more comfortable with the rocking and I am able to work the five lines effectively. The outside is still my weakest area, but I forgot about making a fist and pressing it in with the opposite hand. I also forgot about bending the leg to get the inside line.

I tried these out today with my sister and was able to get feedback on them. I finished with the chi machine and she said she almost fell asleep somehow lol.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
August 5, 2019 - 2:02 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 7

The three leg stretches in this lesson I use regularly. I am glad to revisit these because I have been doing them differently.

Fist of all, I never leaned forward when doing butterfly palm in the figure four stretch. So I improved my approach on this one. The other technique I like to do is palming three points on both legs to open the hips. My partner said that this felt equally as good as the butterfly.

The second stretch, walking on the back of the thigh, has a similar story. I normally sit back further and grab the opposite ankle for support. Shama showed me how to get under the knee. My partner liked this variation better. I usually just walk along the lines, but Shama reminded me to also stretch by leaning back and pushing my foot in. She like both of these stretches.

The final hip opener was a big eye opener. I alway pull straight back and never lean to the inside. My partner noticed a huge difference. I also kneel and squeeze the ankle between my legs for support, but I prefer how Shama showed the sitting variation. I also had trouble with the foot sliding forward until I tried blocking it with my ankle like you did.

I am really grateful to have some clarification on these three stretches.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
August 5, 2019 - 8:41 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

It's often those little adjustments that make a big difference. Smile

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
August 11, 2019 - 5:43 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 8

My big take away from this module was the conceptual ”hip pie”.

This really makes sense to me and will help me think about the body’s anatomy.

My client really appreciated the stretch that moves the knee toward the chest.

I normally do this stretch with out palming the leg, but I see how this is better than my previous approach.

I usually palm the opposite leg, which you taught as adaptation for flexible people.

By palming the same leg, I can sink into the stretch more and my client is more comfortable.

Avatar
Shama Kern
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 7296
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
August 11, 2019 - 11:02 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I am glad you like the conceptual approach of the hip pie. Just like the 6 ways to work on the feet, this works great to make sense out of all these techniques.

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
19
August 19, 2019 - 11:15 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 9

This is the module where the hip pie is actually discussed.

I mistook this module for module 8 because I utterly failed at the therapeutic techniques.

I will try on again sometime soon, but my first two attempts felt unnatural because I didn’t have the right rhythm.

As for the lunge stretch discussed in module 8 I learned to have better form and feel very comfortable with it after module 9. 

Avatar
Ka’el Bey
Wichita, Kansas
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 58
Member Since:
July 20, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
20
August 20, 2019 - 1:41 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 10

I was able to practice these new leg stretch variations with my sister.

The time clock (leg straight out to the side) was something I haven’t tried in a long time. I like how Shama showed us how to rest the leg in  ankle to ease into the stretch gradually.

I never thought to do the blood stop from this angle. It worked on one side, but I had less success on the other. Normally I would do this with straight legs after I work the Sen lines. 

The spinal twist with a straight leg was new material for me. I normally drape the leg over my thigh and rock back and forth (monkey twist).

I also learned to palm the three point during the calf stretch. I usually don’t palm at all, just lean in with my shoulder.

Forum Timezone: Asia/Tbilisi
Most Users Ever Online: 86
Currently Online:
11
Guest(s)
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
mwisdom: 186
DKThai: 174
Karin Secrest: 125
Cindy Gogan: 86
Kathy McChesney: 84
jurasan: 82
Newest Members:
Darcy Horn
Ilka Mueller-Patham
David
Kp
cash slave
Lucas
Forum Stats:
Groups: 1
Forums: 7
Topics: 1160
Posts: 17623

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 5
Members: 856
Moderators: 0
Admins: 1
Administrators: Shama Kern