Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Deborah Dilley's Complete Thai Massage Course Notes
Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
August 9, 2017 - 8:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Whoohoo! I'm starting the class!

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
August 9, 2017 - 11:11 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 1

There were many things that I appreciated about this module.  First and foremost was the discussion about the importance of the interaction between the two partners, as well as the breath and the movement.  That really resonates with me.  I have been through several thai yoga massage sessions and loved them, but I did feel that the practitioner was solely focused on the technique part of the session rather than really interacting with me.  As a yoga instructor I prefer smaller classes or one-on-one sessions because I am constantly looking to my students for feedback.  I'm excited about where the instruction on this course is going to go. 

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6734
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
August 9, 2017 - 6:34 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Hi Deborah, welcome to our forum and the Complete Thai Massage certification program. Please take a moment and familiarize yourself with our certification check list to make sure that it is all organized correctly:

Certification Check List

I am glad to hear that my style of teaching resonates with you. As a yoga instructor you are already in the best position to relate to Thai Massage and learn it more easily. Actually a high percentage of the students of this course are yoga instructors. I am looking forward to reading about your Thai Massage journey! Smile

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
August 10, 2017 - 8:58 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 2

I think that something I know I will personally struggle with in doing Thai massage is being comfortable with my size and weight in relation to the people I will be working with.  I am a 300 pound woman.  I'm fit and I teach yoga on a regular basis....but I am always super conscious of how my body looks or is moving. I know that I resist putting my weight on others out of this irrational fear of crushing someone.

The chi machine technique is interesting.  I had a yoga student this evening who was willing to let me try it with her.  We did this before shavasana.  She is probably the same weight as I am, and it was difficult trying to get her body moving fully.  I did manage to get her hips moving but the rest of her really wasn't.  I was afraid that I was going to have to really man-handle her to get everything moving.  Plus she hyper-extends her knees and I think that that was interfering.  I am going to try the move on a few different body types to get practice, but I think that the next time I try it with my student tonight I'll put her knees under a bolster.  That way they will not hyper-extend and she will be less worried about me holding the weight of her legs.  I know that when I have been on the receiving end of Thai massage I have been very conscious of how much I weigh and what my limbs weigh....so I kept trying to help them lift my limbs.  When I would stop worrying and would relax my limbs it was so much more effective.  I think that if I can use the bolster as a mental crutch, so to speak, my larger clients might be able to relax more and it will be more effective.  She did say that if felt really good on her hips and lower back though...so I will take that as a small victory.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6734
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
August 10, 2017 - 11:31 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

I understand this apprehension due to your weight. Interestingly enough it is the opposite of what I often hear from female students who tell me "OMG, I only weigh 100 pounds, how can I ever work on larger clients and be effective!"

So apprehensions exist on both sides of the spectrum. Here is what I suggest: Rephrase "Putting weight on a body part" with something else like "working with least effort", or "eliminating muscle effort", or "using ideal body mechanics". The truth is that all these are pretty much interchangeable anyway. 

Here is another helpful visualization. Imagine that you are lovingly touching a delicate baby, and get a feeling for this in your body. Then apply this feeling to your clients.

Since you are fit and are teaching yoga, just look at your weight as a benefit which will guarantee that you can work on any size person effectively, whereas a 100 pound woman would have significant limitations on large persons. Using your weight effectively and gracefully is a great skill to develop.

Here is how you can do that: Do one technique where you need to lean in with body weight. Ask your practice partner to tell you how that pressure feels on a scale from one to ten. Then get a feeling for how you need to use your body to work at around 5 to 7 on that scale. This will help you to "dial your body weight in" for Thai Massage work.

Regarding the Chi Machine: Do not try to man-handle anyone. That means you are working with muscle power, and this kills the essence of this move. The effect of this technique comes from moving your hip sideways without any effort. Imagine that your pelvis is filled with water, and you are trying to agitate this water so that it sloshes up against the sides of your hip.

Hyper mobility is THE contraindication for the Chi Machine, however you should be able to get around that with a bolster under the knee.

It is a fact that if someone has a large and heavy upper body, it will be more difficult and in some cases not possible to extend the undulating effect into the nose. I suggest you try this move an a lighter person. Then you can see if you are doing it correctly.

If you get the nose to move on a lighter person (without effort), then you are fine. If the nose still doesn't move, then you are not doing the technique quite right yet.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
August 24, 2017 - 8:27 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 3

I went through this module about a week before I was able to practice on another person.  At the end of my yoga classes I have been doing a similar move with pressing the three points on the feet of my students.  With their familiarity of this move, I took advantage of being able to practice more on their feet and do more extensive work there.  My students were appreciative of the extra attention.

My parents had visited this week and I took the opportunity to try some of the module points on them, specifically my Mom.  My Mom has degenerative cartilage in her hips so there was a lot of trial and error to make sure that she was comfortable.  We also discovered that her arches are extremely sensitive.  I was able to get the chi machine to work on her.  Because of her hips, and her trying to help me more her limbs all the time, I put her knees under a bolster.  That made her stop helping me, and now I know that using a bolster for client comfort does not hinder the move at all.

Another interesting thing that I have found this week is that I have plenty of folks willing to volunteer to be test people, until I tell them that I want to work on their feet. I also was reminded of the importance of really looking at people and their reactions while I am working.  I thought that my Mom would be more vocal about if she was in pain, but she wasn't.  She also wasn't used to having someone focus all of their attention on her.  She kept hiding her face, something that I probably would have done, but once she was more comfortable physically, she was able to relax.  By the end of my practicing on her, we had a really good connection going.  This ended up resulting in the two of us talking while lounging on the floor for a couple of hours afterwards.... I think that my Dad felt a bit left out.  🙂

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
August 24, 2017 - 9:06 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 4

I was very appreciative of this video.  The previous foot massage in module 3 left a lot to be desired.  When I practiced the concepts, I felt like I was missing things and that there were movements and massaging of the feet that I instinctively wanted to do, but wasn't given the technique yet to learn.  I felt that this module gave me more options for movement and improvisation in the body work I am doing.

I do have a question on the movements where you are holding the leg up and twisting the foot...or any of the twisting of the feet positions that seem to extend that twisting movement up along the leg and to the hips...  If someone has knee issues and/or hip issues, it is best to just skip that movement entirely?  I guess that some of it would depend on the individual person, however I am curious to know if there are any modifications to that move where you could still do the essence of the move, but not injure the client?

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6734
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
August 24, 2017 - 12:27 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

The twisting of the foot (twist right and twist left) has no effect on the knee since you are fixing the position of the foot with your other hand.

The technique where you rotate the foot while pushing the leg forward and pulling it back does affect the knee and should not be done on someone with serious knee problems or knee replacement. 

This is a principle for all Thai Massage: The techniques in this course are options to choose from, not mandatory sequences. Just because I show a particular technique, doesn't mean that you should do it on every person and in every session.

If someone has certain limitation or injuries, you need to use your discretion which techniques to use and which ones to avoid on this person. That's part of the art of Thai Massage. It is definitely not a one-size-fits-all system. You will learn a lot more about this throughout this course. Smile

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
August 24, 2018 - 10:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Module 5

Well I am back after an almost year-long hiatus, but I am very excited to be back actively working in the class, especially as my schedule is now allowing me the option of daily study and practice.  This module focused on warming up the leg muscles. I really liked the various options given here for doing that.  I've been a recipient of the pressing down on quad muscles with the body and have always found it to be an odd mixture of discomfort and release. 

But I was more interested in the alternatives from the use of the thumbs and the use of the palms.  I type a lot and have quite a bit of tension in my thumbs and fingers naturally.  Focusing the massage motion on my thumbs results in me getting tired easily, but the option of using the palms instead helps with that....although it puts more pressure on my forearms....which I'll talk more about that experience in the Module 6 writeup.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
August 24, 2018 - 10:17 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 6

Oh wow....looking at the forum dates, I need to revise what I wrote in the last module, it is exactly a one-year hiatus.

This module focused on using the forearms as a tool in massage, specifically on the legs.  One of the things that I am struggling with is the body positioning in general.  Kneeling between someone's legs, or to the side of a person feels natural, but basically sitting with their leg wrapped around me feels almost too intimate.  I'm not sure if that is a cultural thing or just a "me" thing.  There were some giggles.  I do like the ability to use the forearms.  The note of 'softness is the feeling of sinking' was very helpful.  Using this technique is going to take time....I felt like I was leading with the point of my elbow too much and caught myself a couple of times in almost stabbing my practice person with my elbow instead of gently laying it down and pressing.  I'll continue to work on it though as it will take a while for my body to get used to the motions, and I think that I will need to alternate between thumbs, palms, and forearms depending on how my hands feel each day.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6734
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
August 24, 2018 - 11:08 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Thai Massage does use more body contact than other modalities. The big advantage of this is that it gives you much better leverage and allows you to use your body weight in a more efficient way. You can get right on top of people which you can't do on a table. Here in Thailand this body contact is totally normal. Nobody considers it intimate. In all my years of doing Thai Massage none of my clients ever found it too intimate either. That's because in my mind it was not intimate. However if you hold the energy that it is too intimate, then you will transfer this to your client, and they will feel funny about it. So yes, it is a "me" thing. 🙂

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
August 27, 2018 - 11:00 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Module 7

This was the beginning of a series of different leg stretches.  I really liked the tip about looking at foot placement as an indicator of hip openness.  I recently led a yoga class the other day where we started the class in savasana and ended the class in savasana.  I paid attention to the foot placement of my students at the beginning and end of class....I could see a difference from the beginning of the class vs. the end.

Thank you for your comments on the body intimacy thing.  To come degree I really do think that it is a cultural thing.  I have felt reluctance from a Thai practitioner when in leg stretches before....rather I felt her discomfort from moving close to my body in that way.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
August 27, 2018 - 11:15 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 8

I worked on several modules this weekend, but put off entering in my feedback notes, hence the several in one go here.  This module was a continuation of the leg stretches. I really like the analogy of the pie in talking about the angles of the hip and leg stretches here.  It would be interesting to see an overhead view of the angles.  When I have looked at books on Thai massage they aren't specific at all about how you angle the leg and hip stretch. Then again, that is why I am taking the course and I want more in-depth descriptions about what I am learning to do. With the squeeze and circular method of rubbing down the calves, it is better to use the entire hand for the pressure or would focusing more on using your palm be better for the pressure movement?

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
August 27, 2018 - 11:23 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 9

More leg stretches...   Thank you, thank you, thank you for showing the technique to get a client's leg to relax.  That has been one of the major difficulties that I have had.  This was an issue that I had when working with the chi machine move, the client not relaxing, so the idea of almost distracting them with the rocking motion to relax is perfect.  I always include lower back twists into my yoga classes, so I like the ability to further those twists in the Thai massage.  It is very difficult to cue people into deeper versions of twists and this module I think will also assist me in showing my students how much deeper they can get into those twists.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
August 27, 2018 - 11:33 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 10

Whoohoo! More in-depth on the lower spinal twists!  I really liked this module because I can equate so much of the movements done to movements that I regularly utilize in my yoga classes.... it is like Thai yoga massage is coming alive to me so to speak....or I'm feeling much more confident in the body manipulation.  

I tried to do the femoral artery pressure thing but I am not sure that it was effective as my practice body has a lot of fat on the inner thigh and I could not really feel the artery.  On the stretching of the calf muscles (by having the foot flexed and resting up against the practitioner's leg, and pressing down on the upper thigh) is there a danger of damage to the knee if the client has it locked while in the position?

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6734
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
August 27, 2018 - 2:38 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

For me, the whole hand works best for the calf squeeze and pressure technique.

Regarding the knee issue in the calf stretch in module 10 - no, there is no issue with the knee. That is, unless you press really hard against the thigh. But that's not the purpose of this technique. You only lean into the thigh a bit for stabilizing the leg and preventing the knee from buckling. The main purpose of this move is the calf stretch which is extended into the hamstrings if you lift the leg higher.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
August 30, 2018 - 9:44 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 11

Summary session of the previous modules.  This was SOOOOO incredibly helpful to see!  Being able to see you sequence and watch how you are flowing from one move to the other helps me understand the previous modules better.  Additionally it helps a little for thinking about how much time each move naturally should be allocated.  When you are practicing the different techniques, everything moves so much slower because you are doing them multiple times to perfect everything and I can spend an hour doing 3-4 different things.  I know that time and practice will mean that I will get faster, but being able to see you flow through things helps me with seeing best practices on time and flow.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
August 30, 2018 - 9:50 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 12

Working on the legs and hips.  I liked this module as it was more of putting the body into yoga poses that I am very used to doing.  I have a question though on holding the legs, specifically when you are holding the ankles and gently lifting up.... when you do it are you mainly relying on the strength in your arms for that lifting motion? Or lifting more from the knees.  I lifted more in my back, which started to hurt a little after a while.  Part of that may have been that I was trying to keep my balance and the back lifting made me feel like I had more control over my center of gravity... I was trying to be extra mindful of my body movements and flow after watching the last module.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
19
August 30, 2018 - 10:04 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 13

This module is the last of the leg stretches. Using the scooping motion on the upper inner thigh area created some giggles between me and my practice person.  We could both sense that we were feeling awkward about the contact.  I am not sure that I will be using this technique very often as I don't feel to comfortable with it, but my general client pool for my yoga practice (who I am assuming will be the same pool for this modality) may also not be comfortable with it.  I work a lot with individuals for have a sexual violence trauma past and the proximity to the groin area, especially the inner thighs is very triggering for victims.  I enjoyed the discussion on talking about pain.  In my yoga practice I don't use the term discomfort but resistance because it has been easier to remind people to breathe into the resistance in their body to relax.

Avatar
Deborah Dilley
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 40
Member Since:
August 9, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
20
August 30, 2018 - 10:12 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 14

This module focused on hip rocking and enhancing the spinal twists.  I've been taking notes during watching the classes and as I practice the modules and then add them to the forum as I have time.  My handwriting for this module is particularly awful.  The supplemental material for this module was particularly helpful as it talked about practicing the shifting of the body up and over the client's body.  The suggestion of practicing this over a pillow has been helpful.  I have bolsters in my house and as I am walking from room to room for one thing or another I'll stop and practice hovering and going from side to side.  It's hilarious to watch, but is very helpful.

Forum Timezone: Asia/Bangkok

Most Users Ever Online: 81

Currently Online: Constance Crawford
5 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

mwisdom: 186

DKThai: 174

Karin Secrest: 97

Cindy Gogan: 86

Kathy McChesney: 84

jurasan: 82

Newest Members:

mmoakcom

Pirath

ieltsglobal4

Kah Soon Ng

Jenni O'Brien

Tharuka Ekanayake

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 7

Topics: 1072

Posts: 16201

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 5

Members: 772

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: Shama