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jj
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September 25, 2011 - 6:47 am
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I guess this describes the best how I felt today when I received the first module.

I guess one of the most difficult things for me is to get used to work on the floor instead of on a massage table. 

I like the approach of the inner development/awakening to be a massage artist. Creating outside the box will be beneficial for both the client and myself.

JJ 

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Shama
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September 25, 2011 - 12:14 pm
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Hi John,

welcome to the forum, glad to have you in here! After talking to you on the phone, I am sure that you have lot's of valuable things to share. 

Thai Massage can be done on a table, but I always preferred to work on the floor since it gives me much more control over my ergonomics and my body weight since my movements are not restricted by the table. I know this takes some getting used to if you have not worked on the floor before, but once you are used to it, it is actually much easier than using a table since you have many more options that way.

Alternatively, you can adapt it to the table to some degree with a little creativity.

Shama

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jj
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September 26, 2011 - 12:15 am
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Thanks Shama

I have a practical question

The course consists of 35 modules

Is there some overview (or a list) of whats being dealt with in each module?

This is practical when one has to review something without having to go through all of the pdf's or the movies

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Shama
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September 26, 2011 - 1:38 am
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This is actually a great suggestion. I will work on that and include a table of content in the course manual and send you a download link when it is updated. Thanks for your input!

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jj
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September 28, 2011 - 2:19 pm
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Module 2 – The Chi Machine

I like this module for a number of reasons:

1. The emphasis on the therapists wellbeing during the massage is of great significance. The more relaxed the therapist is, the better he/she is aligned and in flow with its own inner chi-flow and with 'Heavenly' Chi or Source. (An open heart and mindset means an open  'pipeline').  This determines in my view the quality and the outcome of the session.

2. The Chi Machine helps to establish both a physical and energetical relationship with the client which will benefit the effectiveness of the other movements during the treatment

3. The most important one for me is the sense of Joy in doing the massage. Its a journey together with the client. It dissolves the boundaries between the two and brings benefit to both the participants. 

JJ

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Shama
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September 28, 2011 - 11:43 pm
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That's a pretty good description of module 1 and the Chi Machine. You picked out some very valuable points. Clearly I won't have to be concerned about you “getting it” Smile

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jj
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October 3, 2011 - 9:55 pm
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module 3. footmassage 1

this 20 minutes video is packed with a lot of info. This is how I dealt with it.

 First I looked at the movie. The next day I looked at it again and made notes of each step provided. Then I looked at it again and compared it with my notes.

Now I am at the stage of practice. Its also a great 'work-out' for me, as I am not used to work on the floor.

What I like especially is the counter-clockwise movement as this helps to pull in the Chi and I assume it will keep the Flow going for the rest of the treatment.

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Shama
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October 3, 2011 - 11:25 pm
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You have a very methodical approach with the videos. That is exactly why I came up with this model of a timed release of this course. I wanted to leave my students time to really look at the videos and practice them and absorb them. Your method should work very well for you , I am sure.

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jj
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October 4, 2011 - 12:24 am
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If you dont have a methodical approach, its my guess that one gets lost in the amount of segments in each module. I divided this module up in 10 parts, each time when you started with a new movement / technique / part in the movie. With over 30 modules, this could mean it will end up with a lot of parts of which it all would nice to remember and integrate.

 

Also by writing them down, it helps me in making them my own, and for the practicality to have the notes during the practice to see where I am and what the next move will be.

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jj
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October 4, 2011 - 6:16 pm
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It might be a bit preliminary as I dont have an overview of the contents of the modules. My guess would be that it would be great to have at the end of the modules a video where you perform a complete treatment with all of the aspects you encorporated in your classes without talking. This would be very inspiring and from my end highly appreciated.

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Shama
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October 4, 2011 - 6:50 pm
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You will be happy to know that there are three summary modules in the course. One for supine lower body, one for supine upper body and one for the back. They show the flow with very little explanation.

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October 8, 2011 - 4:58 pm
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module 4 – footmassage 2

I looked at the video a number of times. What impressed me the most was the easiness in which you were doing the moves. You have automated them very well inside your system, so that you have a lot of freedom to focus on the more healing- and energetic aspects.

We, as 'newbies' at the other hand, have to practice the mechanics as well through repetition before we can experience the same freedom as you do. Its good, however to be reminded that, even when practicing the mechanics, to be aware of the healing and other modalities as well. 

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Shama
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October 8, 2011 - 7:28 pm
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Yes John, the goal of becoming proficient with the techniques is that they become part of you, you don't have to think about them anymore, and they turn into flow. Then Thai Massage feels more like a dance with another person than the execution of a sequence of techniques. Naturally this takes time to develop. If you incorporate the elements of my “Anatomy of a Massage Move” along with the techniques, this will speed up the process considerably. You will soon hear more about this in the course.

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October 9, 2011 - 11:57 pm
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module 5 leg warm-up

In looking at this module I was wondering if in future modules you'll teach something about the integration of the sen-lines (sen-sib) background into your thai healing 'method'.

Warming up the muscles before stretching is important but as far as my experiences are, not commonly practiced in massage shops

On the table I do this by using butterfly side-way strokes on the muscles. Practical problem with the table, as I experience it, is that its hard to find a proper position to perform these strokes or massage in general.

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Shama
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October 13, 2011 - 2:09 am
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You brought up a very good question which I decided to answer in more detail. I have written an in depth article about Thai Massage and Sen line therapy. You can find it here:

/thai-massage-and-traditional-sen-lines/

You are correct in noticing that massage tables do not allow the same flexibility with ergonomics which is possible when working on a floor mat. Provided the practitioner has the physical ability to work on the floor, Thai Massage is definitely more suited to that. After all that is how it was developed and how it has been practiced for thousands of years here in Thailand.

If a practitioner is not able to adapt to floor work, Thai Massage can still be done quite effectively on a table, although there are some limitations. My personal preference is clearly floor work. 

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jj
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October 15, 2011 - 6:13 pm
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module 6 leg warm-up with forearm

what I like about the technique in this module is that it creates a maximum result with minimal physical input. Also, its good to have the leg well supported. Especially when the muscles are tight or painful. I also experimented by sitting at the side of the legs instead of in between the legs. This also works well, but needs more changing of position.

Sitting at the side also works well in situations where clients don't feel comfortable by someone sitting between the legs as shown in the module.

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Shama
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October 15, 2011 - 10:35 pm
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I put a lot of emphasis on maximum results with minimal physical input.

Thai Massage is a modality where there is much more physical contact with various body parts compared to, for example, Swedish massage. In over 12 years of working on clients with Thai Massage, I have never found one single client who expressed any discomfort over me sitting between the legs or anywhere else that might be required by a particular technique.

In Thai Massage there are many techniques where you get much closer to a client than in western massage styles. I have heard arguments from practitioners who are new to Thai Massage expressing concern about this. However in actual practice I have always found that this is just not an issue with clients. As long as you are professional, have clean energy and know what you are doing, clients might find this level of physical touch fascinating, exotic, interesting, and effective. I have never had one objection in all the countless massages I have given. I honestly think that there is no need to worry about this issue at all.

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jj
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October 21, 2011 - 10:15 pm
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module 7 leg stretches 1

Its my experience that restricted immobility of the hips often have a relationship / caused by tightened thigh muscles and not a physical damage in the joint itself.Working on those thigh muscles and the muscles around the hip is very beneficial and helps in a great way to relieve the stiffness and immobility.

Its really handy to do the stretches you show in this module on the floor instead of on the table. Blocking the leg with your leg prevents the client's leg to slide away and have both of your arms free to do whatever is needed.

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Shama
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October 23, 2011 - 11:23 pm
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You are correct. The relationship goes even further than that. Restrictions in the thigh muscles, especially the hamstrings, can result in lower back problems and postural imbalance.

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October 30, 2011 - 8:27 pm
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module 8 leg stretches 2

-I like the concept of the hip-pie as it gives the method of approaching the hip from various angles. I found that not everyone is able to do all of the angles in a very comfortable way (especially the for the hip joint more extreme angles) Before following the 'pie'-stretches I made small circular movements to warm up the muscles around the joint and slowly allow the tension to be released. Is there a specific reason why you advise only to do the movement in one direction and not both clock- and anti-clockwise?

– I found that in dealing with the calf muscle it helps a lot in using the fast rocking movement before allying either the pulling or the squeezing technique

– I tried the fast rocking movement on the knee joint and it worked very well with tendon pain there.

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