Thai Healing Massage Academy | Thai Massage Online Courses

Learn Thai Massage

ONLINE

Convenient - Effective

Professional Training since 2001

Avatar

Please consider registering
Guest

Search

— Forum Scope —






— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Register Lost password?
sp_Feed sp_TopicIcon
Cassandra Pickard's Thai Massage for Sciatica Course Notes
Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
April 11, 2018 - 10:38 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 1

Hi Shama!  First I would like to thank you for including the transcript, video module and audio options…great to have.

Although I have been working on clients with sciatica problems & have been successful for the most part, I did have one client who did not have really good results.  I’m hoping that you will give some new techniques that I can add to my repertoire that may be effective. no pressure Laugh.

Also, thank you for providing such an in-depth description etc. for sciatica as I did not know that both smoking and diabetes are risk factors for it.  I was also unaware that difficulty bending the knees, bending and rotating the feet and lack of reflexes in these areas are also symptoms so I learned something new already.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
April 12, 2018 - 11:53 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I think that you will never be able to get a 100 percent success ratio. There are too many factors involved over which you have no control – life style, eating habits, exercise or the lack of it, mind set, genetic factors, age, previous injuries/operations, and more. It is not just a matter of having some magic techniques to fix sciatica.

You will have to be satisfied with ‘best effort’ results. You should be as skilled as possible and try your best. That’s all you can do, and you will still not be able to help everyone. That’s just how it works in real life. Even medical professionals can’t guarantee results. As a matter of fact their success ratio with sciatica is quite low. 

Bottom line is that this course will improve your skills, but if you expect from yourself that you will fix everyone’s sciatica, you set yourself up for frustration – don’t do that! Smile

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
April 13, 2018 - 4:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 2

I have to say, in all the years I have been doing Thai Massage and all the different courses I have taken throughout these years I have never been given so much insight and explanation regarding the sciatica and pirisformis.  Not only is your explanation thorough but I really appreciate the testing methods you presented.  You are correct…so many clients come to us saying they have sciatica, based on nothing other than it is something they have heard.  I also agree that you cannot, and should not, only focus on a very specific spot just because that is the area that is the issue.  Many times I have gone for massage complaining of a tight low back, or stiff neck only to have the therapist work the entire hour on that spot! I found it very aggravating for one, and also felt like “what about the rest of me”.  Very disconnecting.  That is one of the things that drew me to Thai Massage Smile.  Just curious, what if you are doing the straight leg lift & someones hamstrings are tight & unable to lift up to the 90 degrees?  Are we still able to perform the same test without lifting the leg to the full extension? 

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
April 13, 2018 - 1:20 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Yes, you can do the same test at a lesser angle as well, if that’s all someone can handle.

I am glad to hear that you appreciate the comprehensiveness of this course. Smile

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
April 16, 2018 - 2:14 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 3

I did not know that 17% of the population has the sciatic nerve running through their pirisformis.  I knew that some people did have this, just didn’t know the percentage was that high, so thanks for the info.!  I am pleased that this module began with rocking of the lumbar as it was a nice continuation of the Thai Rocking Massage course I just completed.  My client enjoyed the lumbar rocking, but his favourite was the circling sacrum rocking…he said he was having a hard time staying awake during that one Cool.  I have & do do foot work on clients, however, I have not done the rocking, I have always done a lean in & lean out (more linear pressure).  I quite liked the rocking incorporated into this as I find it a little more fluid.  I started to do the glute circle rocking & was trying to do circling within the circle (I’m sure that doesn’t make sense)…what I mean is when we are doing the circle we are just rocking and making a big circle as opposed to doing little rocking circles to make the circle correct?  Clear as mud I’m sure Wink.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
April 16, 2018 - 10:49 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Yes, clear as mud. Laugh No, really, I get it. The thing is that there are no rules for the rocking, as in what can be done and what cannot be done. There is lots of room for creativity and coming up with your own way of doing things, and even inventing ways to rock that I haven’t thought of. If it feels good for the client and if it flows nicely, then it is good. You can play with small circles, big circles, varying the speed and the intensity, etc. After a while you will just feel if it works well or not. I still keep coming up with new ways to work. Smile

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
April 18, 2018 - 7:31 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 4

Thanks Shama, so glad you understood Smile.

I really like doing elbow work now (I didn’t when I first started doing Thai Massage as I felt I didn’t have as much sensing).  Your techniques on the lumbar are nice and easy to do, especially on larger clients.  Although my practice client is larger, I did the fingertip technique also just for fun.  I did the circling, back & forth AND up & down.  My client LOVED the fingertip wiggle, especially when I used 6 fingers.  He felt that he got better “coverage” that way as his back is big.  My client said his back and sacrum felt numb after I did the percussion techniques…although I use percussion, I don’t recall ever using it directly on the sacrum.  Was pleased to see that it felt great!

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
April 18, 2018 - 10:02 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Not sure what he meant with ‘feeling numb’, but it seems to have been a positive response?? I heard a lot of good feedback from the percussion technique from my own clients and course students. It’s like dissolving the knots in a gentle way without forcing anything. It’s also a great stimulator for energy flow.

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
April 20, 2018 - 9:43 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Yes, “feeling numb” was a good thing he said…more vibrational.

 

Module 5

Both my practice client and I enjoyed rocking the sacrum & SI joint, he for the receiving and me for the giving.  I can see how this technique loosens and facilitates movement throughout the entire hip area.  My client said he felt like his hips had a greater ROM after I did this technique for a little bit.  I did both angles of using the forearm on the buttocks and pirisformis, and although I preferred the one where my arm runs parallel to the edge of the sacrum, my client found them both enjoyable…just slightly different.  The elbow and knee work was a bit tender for my client on his left side so I had to go a little lighter (I just supported myself a little more to take some pressure off).  I often use my thumbs in my practice to work the glutes and pirisformis, and the lean & roll technique has a nice feel to it…my client really liked how it felt also.  I was able to locate a tender spot on both his left and right glute while using my thumbs.  I then did the fingertip circles to get in a little deeper to release some of the tightness.  My client felt much better by the end of this session (even though he didn’t realize that his glutes/pirisformis were so unhappy).   

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
April 20, 2018 - 11:09 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Good to hear that you have no problems working on the glutes and sacrum. Some therapists are hesitant to work this area, but for sciatica work, and especially for piriformis syndrome, this is not only essential, but the only way to work on it.

It sounds like you are doing a good job adjusting the techniques to fit your client.

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
April 24, 2018 - 7:48 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 6

So the power techniques in this module using the knees are quite effective, however, I still have some difficulty doing the double knee rocking on buttocks (cannot seem to get the rhythm down for the life of me).  The face cradle simulation was quite handy and although I do a similar set up I found this one easy to set up and my client found it quite comfortable also.  My client really liked the squeeze, lift, roll technique on the hamstrings using the thumbs and fingers as his left hamstring was quite tight.  I worked on it with this technique for a few minutes and eventually the tightness melted away.  The one-sided lower back lift felt great for my client, he said he actually felt it all the way down his leg on the right side.

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
April 24, 2018 - 7:49 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 7

Although I have been doing spinal twists in the same manner as demonstrated at the beginning of module 7, adding the rocking aspect made a big difference for my practice client.  He found it more gentle than the “regular version”, and more flowing.  All of the pirisformis stretches were also much easier a stretch for him & I was able to take him farther than with just the direct stretches which was great!  Generally he is unable to do a pigeon pose stretch, but after getting loosened up with the other rocking versions of the knee to same & opposite shoulders etc., I was able to do this technique on him.  The rocking from side to side with my clients foot in my groin was very relaxing as opposed to painful so he was happy about that J.  Overall, my client felt this was the best module yet as he really enjoyed the gentler stretching.  All of today’s techniques were comfortable for me & I didn’t find I needed to make any adjustments to make nay of them work which was great also.

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
April 24, 2018 - 10:04 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Great – it sounds like the rocking versions are a winner for you! Smile

The knee rocking on the buttocks is a little tricky to find the rhythm. Try to visualize the up-and-down and the simultaneous sideways motion. After a while it will be so easy that you won’t even understand how you ever found it challenging! Laugh

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
April 26, 2018 - 7:42 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I’m sure I will eventually get the knack of the knee rocking on the buttocks…I remember way back when I first started doing Thai Massage and I found using my left hand/arm to be very uncoordinated.  Now its like they are all one Laugh.

Module 8

The suggestions for positive lifestyle changes to help with sciatica are quite complete.  I have found that suggesting removing the wallet for men & carrying the purse across body (or at least not always on the same side) to be very well-received by clients.  It is amazing to me how many people still believe that being bed-bound for weeks at a time is the thing to do for sciatic pain.  I always tell them, motion is lotion!  Sometimes the mention of regular exercise or yoga is a bit much for some clients to take on as a lot of people have a hard time with change, but the beneficial exercises (a few at a time) seem to be an easier transition.  I usually try to give 2-3 exercises for my clients to do in between their sessions with me.  The whole body circular wave motion (as I have decided to refer to it Wink) is a new one I can add to my repertoire.  Just wondering if you start giving the exercises based on standing, then sitting, lying etc.?  Or do you suggest them based more on what fits their lifestyle ie. give them sitting ones first if they do a lot of sitting or that is what is perpetuating the problem?  

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
April 26, 2018 - 10:31 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I try to see where they are at with their lifestyle habits and give them exercises that might work for them. I don’t really have a fixed approach with that.

Avatar
Cassandra Pickard
Ontario, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 31
Member Since:
February 2, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
April 27, 2018 - 1:46 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Module 9

I took Thai Herbal courses right after my initial Thai Massage studies and certification.  I LOVE the smell of the herbal balls and even made some of my own (although it was very difficult to find the ingredients here in Canada).  Now I just find it easier to order the compresses already made.  I do LOVE to receive Thai Herbal Massage even more than I love the smell, although I don’t have issues with my sciatic Smile.  Like you Shama, I also started to explore different energy work options.  I trained and was certified in Reiki and incorporate this healing modality into my massages.  I don’t generally do just a Reiki session as a stand alone, but instead add it in whenever I feel it is needed.  Its more of an A-Ha moment when during the course of a Thai Massage I find myself just doing it now.  I never question it anymore, I just follow my intuition.  I also like to use visualization techniques at times too.  I have never heard of Spring Forest Qigong, so I will be researching to find out a little more about this form of Qigong.  

Avatar
Shama
Thailand
Admin
Forum Posts: 6620
Member Since:
June 28, 2010
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
April 27, 2018 - 9:33 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I love the Thai Herbal Massage as well. I have been asked a few times to make a course about it. However I know that this cannot be done by many therapists, like when they work in spas, since it is an additional expense and requires more setup. However once you have it all in place, it is really not very difficult to do. 

I learned the Spring Forest Qigong system from a wonderful Chinese man who had immigrated to the US and lived in Minnesota. But that was 25 years ago. I don’t know if he is still doing it or if he is still around. His style of Qigong focuses on learning how to use it for healing yourself and others.

Forum Timezone: Asia/Bangkok

Most Users Ever Online: 81

Currently Online:
18 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

mwisdom: 186

DKThai: 174

Karin Secrest: 86

Cindy Gogan: 86

Kathy McChesney: 84

jurasan: 82

Newest Members:

Jeffrey L Evans

Duncan Andrew

James Walter

Ambrosia Noir

darlene stark

Forum Stats:

Groups: 1

Forums: 7

Topics: 1058

Posts: 15909

 

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 5

Members: 762

Moderators: 0

Admins: 1

Administrators: Shama