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Hi From New Jersey
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Nancy
New Jersey, USA
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June 25, 2016 - 10:37 pm
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Hi, everyone!  I am a 200-hr RYT, teaching mostly chair assisted Yoga to people with movement disorders, spinal injuries, and other joint injuries.  I am also a Reiki Master.  I am already offering Thai Massage, and love it!  I am hoping to add to my knowledge and my Thai Massage "toolbox" through these courses.

Since my regular Thai Massage client has shoulder issues (he is a musician and music teacher with a very active lifestyle), I have just signed up for the Shoulder Massage Therapy Course.  Im looking forward to getting started.

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Shama
Thailand
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June 26, 2016 - 2:07 am
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Hi Nancy, welcome to our forum. You fit in perfectly with your background. We have lots of yoga teachers and Reiki Masters in here. I am sure the shoulder course will give you many nuggets that you can add to your Thai Massage repertoire. Let us know how  it is going with the course. 🙂

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Nancy
New Jersey, USA
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July 1, 2016 - 2:31 am
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I watched Video 1 of the Shoulder Massage Course the other evening.  I use that shoulder press all the time, and I'm excited to try your variations with my regular client.  He loves shoulder work.

I just finished watching Video 2.  You have offered exciting variations in this one.  These are different, and I'm going to practice on some volunteers before using them in my professional practice, so I can use the variations with confidence and elegance.  

So far, I am pleased with this course.  The poses you demonstrate will enable me to add depth and texture to my shoulder techniques.  Your descriptions are detailed, and you offer valuable cautions so I can keep my clients safe and relaxed.  I'm excited to continue!

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Shama
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July 1, 2016 - 4:31 am
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I am happy to hear that you are getting good value out of the course. There is tons more coming up which I think you will find very useful. 🙂

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Nancy
New Jersey, USA
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August 16, 2016 - 11:01 pm
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Finally getting back to these videos.  I watched Video 3; my regular client is a musician (a drummer) and he loves traction of all kinds.  I'm already doing quite a bit of wrist, elbow and shoulder traction with him, and you've given me a few variations I'm looking forward to trying.  I love that these videos are giving me variations.  I spend a good portion of my hour and 15 minutes on my client's shoulders and I always try to change things up a bit in order to gently surprise the muscles.  

I have already been using one traction that you demonstrated in the video, the one with your foot in the armpit and leg parallel to the client's torso.  My client loves that one, and the larger the smooth rowing movement I apply to his shoulder, the more groans of pleasure I get.  Allowing the client's body to gently rock with the gentle lean and release of traction is quite useful, isn't it?

I offer my client a bit of elbow traction with my shoulder work.  I place the knee of my leg closest to his torso gently on the upper arm, just above the elbow (I usually pad the upper arm with a small folded hand towel, and I'm on my toes so that I'm not actually leaning on the upper arm, just preventing it from moving), then bend his elbow and hold his wrist and upper forearm and slowly apply traction by pulling.  This seems to isolate the traction directly on his elbow (because my knee is isolating the traction away from the shoulder, and my hands holding below the wrist isolate the traction away from the wrist).  Not necessarily shoulder work, but this elbow traction is a nice finish to the shoulder work.

Looking forward to watching Video 4!

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Shama
Thailand
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August 17, 2016 - 12:06 am
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Sounds like this course is a perfect fit for you. You even managed to figure the "foot in the armpit" technique out quickly. That's usually one which course students find challenging in the beginning. And yes, I am all for having plenty of variations on hand. Otherwise the saying could apply that "If the only tool you have is a hammer, then everything looks like a nail"! Laugh

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